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Thread: Auditory processing therapy

  1. #1
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    Default Auditory processing therapy

    What kind of therapy helps auditory processing disorders?
    Robin, wife for 20 years to a wonderful man, and mama to 18yo Belle; 16yo Kitty; 12yo Princess, and 10yo Boyo.
    Words for 2015 and 2016: Be her.

  2. #2
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    Years ago I found a lot of ideas and information at this site: Little Giant Steps. It looks like they have since redone their website and I don't see the "articles" page I found so useful. You might find it with a bit of exploring. I do remember her saying that AP was in large part a short-term/working memory issue, and that increasing the active memory would help. There were memory drills for that.
    Wendy, wife of Retired Air Force hubby Sid. Mom to school teacher Virginia, 28yo; Son-in-law Mark; Homeschool graduate and Graphic Artist John, 21 and remaining student Tim, 15.
    I can only do one thing well...You pick: Homeschool the kids, or Clean the house.

  3. #3
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    You can read about Auditory Processing Disorder here.

    My ds did the Fast ForWord program and it helped a lot. We didn't use this Gemm Learning's services, but went through Wings To Soar Online Academy. Wings To Soar has changed their website though, so I don't know if they offer it any more or not. It was way less expensive through them.
    Wife to Pastor Tim and Mom to April (2010 homeschool/Cornerstone Univ grad.), Erica (2012 homeschool/culinary/Ashland Univ grad.), Jacob (12th gr.), and Jesse (3rd gr).

  4. #4
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    Thank you.

    My child is struggling with not hearing sounds "in order." This makes spelling a challenge for her, but that's not the only aspect of it.

    For my dd with sensory issues, we started with occupational therapy, then added in several other therapies, and were able to help her overcome her issues.

    However, I don't know what kind of therapist to look for - is it an OT, or what?
    Robin, wife for 20 years to a wonderful man, and mama to 18yo Belle; 16yo Kitty; 12yo Princess, and 10yo Boyo.
    Words for 2015 and 2016: Be her.

  5. #5
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    Speech therapists will diagnose this. We went to the speech and hearing center at our local children's hospital.
    Melissa, Five in a Row Staff - Community Manager
    Robert's my man. Jacob, 13, and Mattie, 9, entertain me and keep me on my knees!
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  6. #6
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    Kyle has mild audio processing. Using the computer software Earobics was one thing the doctor suggested.
    Hollie, Special Needs Forum Moderator
    Wife to my best friend Tom and mom to 18yo Eli, 16yo Kyle, and 12yo Noah (with Down syndrome)
    If a child can't learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn. Ignacio Estrada


  7. #7
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    We used Earobics too, but it wasn't working for my ds. Fast ForWord works on the deeper issues that he needed first to even be able to do the Earobics.

    Robin, my ds was unable to process the sounds, and remember the order of those sounds, in order to figure out the word. He can do that now.

    If you are looking for a diagnosis, then a speech/language pathologist would be the right person. My ds worked with a speech therapist from the time he was 5 years old until he was 10. She just worked on the speech issues though, not the auditory processing. The funny thing was I kept mentioning auditory processing to her over those years, and she always dismissed my concerns. Because of that, I tried not to worry about it, and didn't seek extra things. Even when I would mention his lack of reading skills, she didn't seem concerned. She was a school therapist. She was excellent in remediating his expressive speech issues and some receptive issues, but I couldn't get anywhere with her beyond that. I'm very grateful for her services, but I honestly think she didn't know anything about auditory processing disorder. We didn't do the Fast ForWord until years later, but it still made a great improvement even though he was older.

    I'd say, look for a speech/language pathologist like mentioned above from a children's hospital, not a school therapist. I figured the school therapist had the same credentials, but I'm not sure if they do or not.
    Wife to Pastor Tim and Mom to April (2010 homeschool/Cornerstone Univ grad.), Erica (2012 homeschool/culinary/Ashland Univ grad.), Jacob (12th gr.), and Jesse (3rd gr).

  8. #8
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    Have you checked out Able Kids foundation in Colorado? I've heard excellent things about them from diagnosing APD to helpful ideas. Also, one of the Facebook APD groups was able to get a small group interested in a discount rate for hearbuilder, so we each paid $5 & then it didn't hurt the wallet so bad if the program wasn't a good fit.
    An audiologist that specializes in APD can give great references for speech pathologists that know about APD (all ST aren't the same) Some suggestions our audiologist gave was: Phonographix, the game Simon, Barnaby's Burrow game. Many suggestions would come after the diagnosis that would be specific to the deficits they find during the testing. (I know this is two months after the question).

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