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Thread: When did you start chronological history?

  1. #1
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    Default When did you start chronological history?

    More questions!

    So far in our little homeschool, history has been largely done in the FIAR context or similarly but with other books as our spine. We did complete one summer of Story of the World - Volume 1 which the kids liked. We also studied American History with our co-op one year through the Civil War.

    Hannah will be in 5th grade next year and I am wondering when I should start a chronological study of history. I know there is no "right" answer, but I am wondering what history has looked like in your own homeschool.

    Honestly, perhaps I am looking for encouragement to keep studying history FIAR-style for one more year.

    Thanks!
    Loving, learning, and living in central VA with my adventurous husband of 14 years and our three children.

  2. #2
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    7th grade, approximately. Basically, late middle school.

    I read A Child's History of the World as a read-aloud at lunch, too, which they liked. They were all at different ages when we did that.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  3. #3
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    Thanks again Rebe! That helps. I'm not familiar with that book, I will check it out.
    Loving, learning, and living in central VA with my adventurous husband of 14 years and our three children.

  4. #4
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    Not soon enough. My older son was about 8th grade when I decided to switch to a chronological history curriculum. We chose TruthQuest and tried to cram the entire series into 3-4yrs. It wasn't long enough, and he ended up missing out on the more recent modern history. TQ offers lots of opportunities to follow rabbit trails and it's easy to get stalled on an interesting topic. That's great when you have plenty of time to cover it, not so much when you are trying to plow through.

    So, I would say start looking at options now, consider the length of time needed for your chosen curriculum, and use that info to help guide your timeline.
    Last edited by WendyW; 06-09-2016 at 10:43 PM.
    Wendy, wife of Retired Air Force hubby Sid. Mom to school teacher Virginia, 28yo; Son-in-law Mark; Homeschool graduate and Graphic Artist John, 21 and remaining student Tim, 15.
    I can only do one thing well...You pick: Homeschool the kids, or Clean the house.

  5. #5
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    4th Grade. We'd done bits & pieces with FIAR & one such book had us using a lovely HSITW Time Traveler pack. My boys loved it so much that when we came to the end of the year & discussed what kids wanted to learn next year they both asked for more history. So we did. Both of my boys love history.. A lot. So much so that over dinner the other night my husband expressed how much he zoned out during history & my eldest wailed, "WHAT?! How could you? It's like my favourite subject ever & I can't understand how ANYONE could sleep through history!"

    My husband, somewhat sheepish now replied with, "You don't understand Mate! My teacher was BORING, he had HORRIBLE breath, & he never made ANYTHING fun. If I'd had a teacher like you do, maybe I would have liked it.."

    The youngest retorted with, "You sound like Uncle S.." Who was visiting us recently & went a little nutty over reading some of the books we use for history before saying, "Oh man, if I'd been taught like this I would have actually ENJOYED learning history."

    We started with US history though, & not ancients, which we had covered lightly when the kids had a "thing" for Egypt. We did US history & then moved forward from there taking our time. At the ages they were I knew it would excite them far more then ancients would. It turned out to be a beautiful unfolding for us & helped cement their love for history.
    Kendra, wife of Lawrence, mother of three.

    I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.

  6. #6
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    Wendy - Thanks so much for sharing your experience. I haven't heard much about TruthQuest, but I will check them out.

    Kendra- Thanks for sharing! What a lovely thing for your husbands and your boys to say! I knew from reading your blog, you had done some chronological studies!
    Loving, learning, and living in central VA with my adventurous husband of 14 years and our three children.

  7. #7
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    I would have liked to start it sooner than we did, which was upper middle school, but we couldn't. So, beginning in upper middle school we did it rather ineffectively and without any fun. Now, however, my oldest loves history. She uses MoH as a jumping-off point and dives in herself, reading books and researching topics / people of interest. She feels like MoH gives her that freedom.

    We tried another curriculum one semester when she was a freshman. I can't remember the name of it but it hasn't been mentioned above. Beautiful curriculum but not for us.

    I would suggest finding something fun when they're younger and building gradually, going around again, even if it means changing to a different curriculum in high school to recover the ground.

    Also, I made a timeline book. Couldn't find one I liked, so I found one close and adapted it. That has been a huge addition to my olders. Every person or event they study in any subject, and all kinds of other things, are added. It's pretty cool.
    Robin, wife for 21 years to a wonderful man, and mama to 19yo Belle; 17yo Kitty; 13yo Princess, and 11yo Boyo.
    Words for 2015 and 2016: Be her.

  8. #8
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    We've used SOTW as the basis for a 4-year classical approach to chronological history. Grace completed 3 years before we stopped homeschooling her, and Sarah just finished all 4 years. She's midway through 6th grade but wanted to tag along with Grace when she was younger. Hannah will be starting ancient history in the fall; she's entering 4th grade. I alternate history and science through the week so that we don't cover both subjects each day. We do map work, extra reading, and the occasional project. I use the SOTW test books so that the girls get practice with test taking.
    Mom to Grace (14), Sarah (12), and Hannah (10)
    Using my college degree in ways I never imagined....

  9. #9
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    Robin and Laura - Thanks for sharing your experiences!

    I asked my oldest what period of history she would like to study and she said, "Egypt."
    I think I am going to go with the Simply Charlotte Mason "Genesis through Deuteronomy and Ancient Egypt" guide. It is pretty simple, but is substantial enough that we can add activities and extra books/read alouds if we like. Plus I have the SOTW books and activity guide if I want to add something in.

    I'll let you know how we like it in the early fall!
    Loving, learning, and living in central VA with my adventurous husband of 14 years and our three children.

  10. #10
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    Have I ever done history chronologically? Nope.

    We've done different time periods in history and good long chunks of it, but I've never done that approach overall.

    I don't think my students have suffered for it. They know where things belong in the context of the bigger picture. We've used all sorts of programs in the way we want to.
    Heather wife to Dan and embracing the independent nature of homeschooling with our fantastic four (19 ds, 17 dd, 15 ds, 12 ds).

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