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Thread: Dyslexia and high school

  1. #1
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    Apr 2006
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    Default Dyslexia and high school

    Debating on which board this should go and trying it here.

    Can anyone share what resources you have used for a high school student with dyslexia? Curriculum or other helps. Any advice or experience is welcome.

    Thank you!
    Leslie Nelsen, Family Room Moderator
    Wife to Roger, Mom to Christopher (24) married to Emily, Rebecca (21), Joshua (17), Isaiah (15), Daniel (13), and Eliana Joy (10).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    SC
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    7,970

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    Leslie, I don't know how often Esther checks in here. However, you may want to message her on FB.
    Hollie, Special Needs Forum Moderator
    Wife to my best friend Tom and mom to 19yo Eli, 17yo Kyle, and 13yo Noah (with Down syndrome)
    If a child can't learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn. Ignacio Estrada


  3. #3
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    Apr 2006
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    North Carolina
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    Thanks Hollie! I will.
    Leslie Nelsen, Family Room Moderator
    Wife to Roger, Mom to Christopher (24) married to Emily, Rebecca (21), Joshua (17), Isaiah (15), Daniel (13), and Eliana Joy (10).

  4. #4
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    Mar 2009
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    Tsukuba-shi, Japan
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    I have a profoundly dyslexic child starting high school next month. He attends a private school. My dd in middle school also attends the same school and I am homeschooling my 10 yr old. All my kids are dyslexic. The thing I really like about their private school, that I think carries over to homeschooling, is that they do not use a text book and worksheet based approach. Instead they do a lot of research projects, hands on projects, oral presentations, dramas, science experiments, etc.

    My main goal with my high schooler is helping him to become independent. We are using as much AT (assistive technology) as possible. We really like using speech to text via Google Docs (It worked better for us than Dragon) and we have a subscription to Bookshare where he can use text to speech. We also us a laptop with apps for text to speech. We have the c-pen exam reader to help with the few worksheets and test that his school uses.

    For foreign language we are trying out American sign language as an independent study course. We are using this free website: http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/

    One curriculum that I used for middle school that I think would also work well for high school are the Intellego Unit studies. I did the World War and the World War Two units. I like that it has a lot of multimedia elements, can be read on computer with text to speech and has a variety of projects. I extended the study by doing my own of the Korean War, The Vietnam War, other elements of the Cold War and the Civil Rights Movement. I also added in some Historical Fiction, Biographies and Poetry and some essay writing to cover English as well. I think this could easily be done for high school level work. I also added in some videos from Discovery Education (we have a subscription).

    I'm afraid I don't have any good resources for high school Math and Science. I do make color coded sample problems for those more complicated multi-step math problems that come with algebra and geometry to use as a reference and that seems to help. A key element in my eldest son's science courses at school seem to be the student creating and writing up his own science lab reports after conducting his own experiments and usually a yearly research paper about a famous scientist, innovation, science discovery, or how science has impacted the world. He does a lot better on these kind of projects than on memorizing facts and formulas. So a curriculum that incorporates that kind of hands on student lead learning might work well.

    Sorry, I don't have an easy pre-made curriculum that I can highly recommend. Hopefully I've given you a few ideas to get you thinking. If you find something great let me know. I may end up homeschooling my youngest through high school and will be on the hunt for curriculum myself in a few years. Here's hoping you find something that works well for you!
    Lindsey Carter
    Wife to Chris for 17 years and Mom to Wesley 14, Adelaide 12 and Hudson 10

  5. #5
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    Feb 2007
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    Au
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    Our children have dyslexic like symptoms, but as you know, Leslie, they are VPD instead.

    The #1 thing I suggest is to make sure that the curriculum you picks works WITH them. My eldest is on the severe end of the spectrum so even with his visual tints on he can struggle to see things "right" at times. This means in order for him to be independent {and thus semi-normal} he needs curriculum that serves him in an audio or visual manner. There are a LOT of options out there these days & I'm grateful for all of them.

    My boy uses IEW for writing because the lectures are in video format. We picked up the PDF student pack to copy on his special coloured paper {you may find that using coloured paper helps your boy} & he does his key word outlines on paper, everything else is done on the computer. He's free to type or use Dragon Speak. Dragon Speak is expensive, has a huge learning curve, but comes highly recommended by our specialist who specialises with children in Dyslexia & VPD.

    For math he uses MUS because it's available in video format. I copy his book onto his special coloured paper & throw it in a binder. He uses a calculator & has since roughly 7th. He knows his facts by heart & when he's having a "good vision day" he will not use the calculator to keep his brain fresh with the facts. He also has a special coloured, mini, "white" board {its not white} that he can use as scrap paper when working on problems if he needs/wants & I also bound up some of the coloured paper for him to use as a scratch pad.

    For the past few years he's used a literature based curriculum solo thanks to access to companies like Audible {we're 12+ year members so our audio library is.. well stocked} & Learning Ally. I will forewarn that the Learning Audio quality is NOT as great as Audible, but my son does have favoured narrators there & aside from ONE narrator {who attempted to describe pictures in a non-ficiton book} he's loved the independence he has & the fact that he can enjoy a lit based curriculum. He is changing curriculum in September {new school year} & I'm a little nervous for him because all his books will not be available in audio format. I'm contemplating narrating them myself in advance.. {I have in previous school years created video lessons of myself teaching things, or recorded myself reading books if need be.. It takes time & dedication, but the rewards are huge when he can feel "normal" & maintain independence..}

    He uses Apologia for Science because he can use the audio lectures & then open the book for the diagrams & photos. He takes a LARGE amount of notes both in sketches & words. His notes have come a LONG way over the years. He does the OYO orally, the experiments on his own {labs are typed}, & quizzes online. Did you know that VirtualHomeschoolGroup {.org} offers free online classes? He uses the Apologia ones in the At Your Own Pace format for the purse simplicity of using the online tests.

    The only curriculum that is not audio or video based is his grammar {requirement all 4 years of high school} but he uses IEW's Fix-It. He doesn't do rewrites, but retypes & our method in using it works well for him.

    I will say this, the difference we've seen in him since making the intentional choices to provide curriculums that work with him are pretty huge. It's funny, but years & years ago when my kids was relying on audio books they were a shunned idea, but now they are considered "norm" which helps a bit. He no longer feels he needs to clarify he "listened" to it vs physically read. He does read books, but I only schedule a very small selection of those & he works through them at his own pace. He has good days & bad days, but he's very honest about them so I know that if he's having a bad day & can only imagine a page or two it's the best he can cope with.

    Interestingly, since choosing this path the improvements he's shown with the specialist at his visits is pretty huge too. We are trying to apply these same principles to the younger one who is far less severe, but I know some of the curriculum older uses younger will not mesh well with. So we'll see.. The younger won't be US high school level for another year.
    Kendra, wife of Lawrence, mother of three.

    I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.

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