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Thread: Moms' Book Thread ~ Week 29 (July 16th- July 22nd)

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    Default Moms' Book Thread ~ Week 29 (July 16th- July 22nd)

    . I hope that it's been a pleasurable reading week for all.

    I read: Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama's Washington – 3 Stars - This was interesting at first, quite gripping actually, but as the book progressed it became a rather tedious read. I think that I would have appreciated it more had read this when it was published a few years ago, when it was current and fresh. I wish that I had read it then.



    and From Julia Child's Kitchen - 3 Stars - This cookbook is a delightful read, but I can’t really recommend it, since I don’t care for the layout as far as cookbooks go. I like recipes to be easy to read – line-by-line, short, and user-friendly, as opposed to long paragraphs. I got my copy used and I didn’t pay much for it, so I’m happy that I have it and I know that I’ll refer to it from time to time. I love Julia Child and all her stories, but I can’t imagine that I’ll use it much as a cookbook.

    My favorite quote:
    “I like to cook for 2, or for 4 or 6 at the most 8 people. Beyond that you get into quantity cooking and that is just not my field at all. The last time we had 12 for a sit-down dinner and I did all the cooking, and Paul and I did all the setting up, serving, and washing up afterwards, I said never again. I’ll do a buffet, but I don’t consider that civilized dining; it is feeding, and I like to sit down at a well-set table.”


    Julia and Paul having breakfast at La Pitchoune, their home in Provence, 1969

    and Because They Hate: A Survivor of Islamic Terror Warns America – 5 Stars - This was a fascinating and compelling read from an insider on the militant Islamic takeover of Lebanon by someone who was there. The author, a Lebanese Christian, is a survivor of terrorism and she warns the rest of the western world, telling it like it is. One starts to realize how terrorists take over a country one bit at a time and very gradually. I try to not push books very often, but to me this is a must-read.

    I highlighted so many quotes that I loved, that at times I felt as if I was highlighting most of the book. Here are a few of my favorites, but I’ve only included them here since they’re short. If you’re interested in seeing more quotes that I liked, they’ll probably show at the bottom of my review on Good Reads.

    “Islamic terrorism has nothing to do with economic position or status in life.”

    “Americans just don’t realize the viciousness of the militant Islamic fundamentalist.”

    “Anyone who disagrees with radical Islamic propaganda is being attacked in the media, on college campuses, and at rallies countering events that promote the Islamic cause.”



    Finally, thought to share this photo that my daughter took in Shakespeare and Company while we were in Paris. This bookstore was magical. I thought of all of you and wish that we'd been there together.

    MY RATING SYSTEM
    5 Stars
    Fantastic, couldn't put it down
    4 Stars
    Really Good
    3 Stars
    Enjoyable
    2 Stars
    Just Okay – nothing to write home about
    1 Star
    Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Negin; 07-16-2017 at 01:56 PM.
    "A good book is an event in my life" ~ Stendhal, "The Red and the Black"

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    Hi book friends!

    Negin, that Brigitte Gabriel book has been added to my list of books to read someday. I've been impressed with a few of the videos I have seen of her speaking. She has an essential message for the West! I picture she and Ayaan Hirsi Ali being coffee buddies and finding endless things to chat about...

    Recently, a friend was telling me about a gripping Amazon Prime series that he and his wife are hooked on: The Man in the High Castle. He explained a bit of the alternate history plot to me: what if the Germans and Japanese had won WWII and had carried all their plans to fruition? This series takes place about 15 years after the end of the war, and the former US is divided between the Germans and the Japanese. A banned book is causing quite a stir because it posits an alternate history in which the Allies had won!

    Well, I don't have Amazon Prime, but the story intrigued me, so I decided to check my library online to see if the story was based upon a novel - sure enough! So I got on the waiting list. It must be good if there is a waiting list, right? Well, I'm sorry to say that the writing is just el stinko. The characters are flat and the dialogue is stilted. but there are some interesting ideas explored that I had never come across in a book. For example, what if the Western US had been controlled by the Japanese for 15 years, and their mindset and worldview completely changed our culture? What if Americans became second class citizens to Japanese settlers? What if Jewish people who escaped the Eastern US were expedited from the Western States back to the East to face certain death? So I'm sticking with it and will finish it, but it could have been so much better.
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

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    I am still reading Random Harvest and a book that's soon to be out by Chrystal Evans Hurst (Tony Evans' daughter), She's Still There. She's Still There is a Christian book about finding your purpose in life. It's a good book, meant to be read thoughtfully.

    Right now, I've been in the car all day, returning from a Jane Austen festival in Louisville. My daughter in Indiana came down and met David and me there. David and her dh did man-things while the two of us went to the festival yesterday. This week my daughter Abby and I are going to begin studying Pride and Prejudice for her literature course and now I'm all fired up!!! Anna and I had a great time! If you ever get the chance to go, do. It's a three-day event and was very well done!
    Wife to David, mom to 9, homeschooling Thomas (18), Abby (14). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 1 grandson! Homeschooling since 1986, Rowing since 2000.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    Negin, that Brigitte Gabriel book has been added to my list of books to read someday. I've been impressed with a few of the videos I have seen of her speaking. She has an essential message for the West! I picture she and Ayaan Hirsi Ali being coffee buddies and finding endless things to chat about...
    Kathleen, yes! I'm quite sure that Brigitte Gabriel and Ayaan Hirsi Ali are at the very least acquaintances. I'm pretty sure that I've seen a picture of them together at some event.
    We recently got Amazon Prime and I'll see if we can get "The Man in the High Castle". Sometimes Amazon Prime acts weird here. The series sounds great and I was just about to add the book to my wish list, but then when I heard that the writing stinks, I think not. That's disappointing. Still want to know what you think of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    Right now, I've been in the car all day, returning from a Jane Austen festival in Louisville. My daughter in Indiana came down and met David and me there. David and her dh did man-things while the two of us went to the festival yesterday. This week my daughter Abby and I are going to begin studying Pride and Prejudice for her literature course and now I'm all fired up!!! Anna and I had a great time! If you ever get the chance to go, do. It's a three-day event and was very well done!
    Joy, "She's Still There" sounds like a lovely book with depth.
    The Jane Austen festival sounds like a dream! What perfect timing for your P&P course with Abby.
    "A good book is an event in my life" ~ Stendhal, "The Red and the Black"

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    Negin, that picture truly IS magical--thank you for sharing! And Joy, I've heard good things about that festival before...I think that will have to be added to my bucket list! I'm a huge Austen nerd, so I'm sure I'd enjoy it.

    I finished The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend, and I'm sorry to say, I can't recommend it. I think I'm done with my "beach read" run now--almost all of them have been disappointing. I guess I'll just go back to Agatha Christie again next year when I need some "brain candy" (as I call it!).

    Today I started Monet's House (finally), and am so glad I bought it! Thank you, Negin, for the recommendation. I think I'm going to start saving now for my pilgrimage.
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (10) & Madelyn (8).

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    Kathleen, I have The Man in the High Castle on my TBR list but after reading your remarks about the writing I think I will strike it from my list.

    Vicki, you are not the only one who didn't like 'Broken Wheel.' I don't think I have heard many good comments about that book at all. Enjoy Monet's House!

    I finished He Said She Said, a domestic noir. It was a bit slow in places but the twists and turns were aplenty, even up to the very last sentence. I am now reading Since We Fell by Dennis LeHane, who has also written Mystic River and Shutter Island. This is my first LeHane book, the writing is very good but I am having trouble getting into the story.

    I am also reading Restoring Beauty: The Good, the True and the Beautiful in the Writings of C.S.Lewis by Louis Markos. I am thoroughly enjoying this book. He has chapters on each book of the Narnia Cronicles, as well as The Abolition of Man.
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (18), ds (16) and dd (14)

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    Oh Joy, the Jane Austen festival sounds amazing! I would love to go some day. Julia, is your daughter settling in? How are you? I'm not sure what I'm reading this week after I finish the latest Miss Fortune (Jana Deleon) mystery. I'm reading it because my mother REALLY wants to stare it with me. Like the other books, it follows a probable format but it's kind of like visiting old friends for an afternoon. I'm looking forward to finishing the book so I'm trying to force myself to carve some time into the day.
    IN THE END, ONLY KINDNESS MATTERS
    Mom to 5 girls and 5 furry kids too
    20 Years Homeschooling and still learning

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki P in VA View Post
    Today I started Monet's House (finally), and am so glad I bought it! Thank you, Negin, for the recommendation. I think I'm going to start saving now for my pilgrimage.
    Vicki, I'm happy that you got "Monet's House". Hopefully, you will get to go there someday. When you do, that book will make your visit far more enjoyable and meaningful.
    Sorry that your beach reads weren't enjoyable. I haven't read a typical beach read in the longest while. Yes, I agree, go for Agatha Christie instead!

    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaT View Post
    I am now reading Since We Fell by Dennis LeHane, who has also written Mystic River and Shutter Island. This is my first LeHane book, the writing is very good but I am having trouble getting into the story.
    I am also reading Restoring Beauty: The Good, the True and the Beautiful in the Writings of C.S.Lewis by Louis Markos. I am thoroughly enjoying this book. He has chapters on each book of the Narnia Cronicles, as well as The Abolition of Man.
    Julia, "Shutter Island" has been on my huge pile of books for the longest while. I don't know when I'll read it, but I'll give it a go eventually.
    The Louis Markos book sounds wonderful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    I'm not sure what I'm reading this week after I finish the latest Miss Fortune (Jana Deleon) mystery.
    Michele, those books always sound so nice.
    "A good book is an event in my life" ~ Stendhal, "The Red and the Black"

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    I finished The Man in the High Castle last night. I was left with the lingering feeling of... huh? So I skipped (figuratively!) over to Amazon and Goodreads to see reviews. There are hundreds - thousands perhaps. It gets about a 4.5 out of 5 overall anywhere it is rated. It is considered a pioneering sci-fi alternate-reality piece of lit. Some people were able to look past the poor writing and to the bigger picture ideas and be impressed. Many call it a work of genius. Considering that is was written in 1963 (I did not realize that until digging into the reviews), I can see where some of the ideas in it were quite ahead of their time.

    One commentator wrote, "Obtuse, but not completely without merit." Ok, I'll give it that.

    Another remarked that it read like an unfinished manuscript, sent off the the publisher before the writer could flesh out scenes and characterization. Agreed.

    About one of every 10 said, great ideas, but the writing though... That's where I fit in!

    The author P.K. Dick wrote the novel upon which Bladerunner was based, and a few other books of his were the inspiration for sci-fi or alternate-reality movies. He is considered to be an influence/inspiration in movies such as Matrix and Inception. Commentators who had seen the Amazon Prime adaptation of High Castle said it addresses the weaknesses in the novel and goes off in some of its own directions. I usually do a Prime free trial around Christmas, so I'll give it a try then.
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

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    My oldest loves The Man in the High Castle -- the series, not the novel.

    I have had Too. Much. Work. plus a homeschool convention this weekend and I am making very slow progress through The Genius of Birds. It's still good, though.

    Stacia, I hope you see the post that Vicki had at the very end of last week's thread -- I thought of you right away! Maybe you've seen that link before, though.

    Happy reading, everyone. Wish me LESS work so I can read (and breathe) a little bit more.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 18 * motion-loving ds 15 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

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