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Thread: Moms' Book Thread ~ Week 45 (November 12th - November 18th)

  1. #1
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    Default Moms' Book Thread ~ Week 45 (November 12th - November 18th)

    everyone.

    I read Dogs as I See Them - 5 Stars - The older I get, the more I love dogs. This charming book was out of print for many years. It’s now back in print with a forward by the author Ann Patchett. The dog sketches are captured beautifully. If you love dogs, this book is an absolute joy. If you know someone who loves dogs, this would be a perfect gift.





    I haven't read much else. I've started and given up on a few books. Not sure what I'll be reading next.

    Two Kindle books on sale today:

    A Tale of Love and Darkness

    The Kingdom by the Sea





    MY RATING SYSTEM
    5 Stars
    Fantastic, couldn't put it down
    4 Stars
    Really Good
    3 Stars
    Enjoyable
    2 Stars
    Just Okay – nothing to write home about
    1 Star
    Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    "Give me a room whose every nook is dedicated to a book." - Robert Southey

  2. #2
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    I'm still doing a lot of extra reading for work, but one that I'm reading for that project might be of interest here, so figured I'd share. It's Jamaica Kincaid's A Small Place, and I love it! If you've never read any of her work, this might be a good place to start (unless you want to read fiction, in which case she's best known in that genre for Annie John. I haven't read that one, so can't say yay or nay yet!). Anyway, her prose is very stream of consciousness, which makes her not for everyone, I suppose--but she is a fantastic, insightful, honest author whose work speaks primarily to postcolonial Caribbean experience. The book I mention here is short enough that (if you had time) you could probably read it in one sitting; or you could mull on it for hours. I also love her work, My Garden (Book), which sounds like a book about gardening, which it is in a way--but really it's about colonial rule, women, life...I think I need to reread that one!

    I haven't started it yet, but plan to start Anne Tyler's A Spool of Blue Thread in audio format tomorrow in the car. I'm not usually a fan of fiction in audio book format, but I've been wanting to read this one for a while, and figured this might be the only way i get to it! We'll see.
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (10) & Madelyn (8).

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    "Give me a room whose every nook is dedicated to a book." - Robert Southey

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    I started No Longer at Ease, the 2nd book in the African Trilogy. I'm enjoying it, maybe not as much as Things Fall Apart, but I think that's partly because it's set so much later (1950s) that the history is just not that much different than today. The third book is apparently set between these two, time-wise, and is the author's favorite. So my plan is to stick this one out and try to read all three.

    Negin, that dog book looks so sweet. Maybe somebody'll do one on cats.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

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    I've been reading Our Town, the play by Thornton Wilder. (I'm reading it for our Am. Lit book club, but, hey, I'm reading ). It had been ages since I'd read it, and I vaguely remembered a bit of the plot and themes, but re-reading it reiterated so many things. It has such a good message about the fleeting nature of life and how we pay so little attention to the uniqueness of each and every day and how we don't cherish the little things and moments in life. I think the older we get (and see how quickly children grow up), the more we do appreciate this. It was a quick read. Our book discussion is this afternoon -- we'll see how the girls enjoyed it.

    Next up is The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. https://www.amazon.com/House-Mango-S...n+mango+street I've been trying to go in a timeline order, but I'm breaking with that. Thus far, we've just read plays, and I think the girls are ready for something more modern and something they can relate to a bit better, so we're jumping in time for a "good" read before Christmas. I hope they like it -- a great "search for self" novel


    Negin -- I've always liked Things Fall Apart (and that's a great kindle price on it!). I had my students in my lit class (at coop) last year read that and do a research paper on it last year. The mixed reviews were so funny -- I had some who loved it, and some how hated it. The same with Animal Farm -- Katie and another couple of kids loved it, and others hated it. Interesting.
    Wife to Jim and Mama to Katie (1/01), Mattie (9/02), Cale (4/05), and Ben (8/08)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paige P View Post
    I've been reading Our Town, the play by Thornton Wilder.
    I was a theatre major and then an English teacher, and I have never read or seen this play. I should remedy that.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

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    Ladies, can ya'll please help me?

    I need some opinions and maybe some options .....
    So I'm doing this Am. Lit book club, and it's for a group of about 7 or 8 high school girls, freshmen through seniors. There's one family in particular who is VERY sensitive about what they read (they stopped the Crucible mid-way through because they don't read about witches, etc., and they didn't realize it was all a hoax, and it scared her dds). I was going to try to do some more modern books, but I haven't read them, and as I've read reviews, there are at least 4 of them that deal with r@pe, incest, "coming" s@xuality, etc. I just don't think that especially the younger set are ready for that, and I do NOT think that that is the "common" experience for most people, especially this group of teens. So I'm looking for some other books that are/will be considered "classic" American Lit. I don't mind a bit of language, but I don't want just the "old, white men" books (Moby Dick, Cooper, Faulkner -- blah). We've read several plays, and they're tired of that, and so am I.
    Any suggestions/thoughts?

    I'm nixing The House on Mango Street for now until I can completely read it -- I checked commonsensemedia, and I just think it's too much for the "younger" crowd
    And now I'm doubting many things on my list

    Can ya'll please give me some ideas? I'm fine with some language, but I'm not fine with the "growing up because of s*xual encounters" theme.
    Thoughts? Ideas?

    I think I'm going to re-read The Orphan Train -- I think they'd enjoy that. Of course, it's been years since I'd read it, too ....

    They're reading Huck Finn over Christmas. I'm definitely also doing
    The Glass Menagerie
    Their Eyes Were Watching God
    A Raisin in the Sun
    Death of a Salesman?

    What else might they LIKE?

    Thanks for your help!
    Wife to Jim and Mama to Katie (1/01), Mattie (9/02), Cale (4/05), and Ben (8/08)

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    I'm thinking about starting a co-ed high school literature group when Tim is old enough and I talked with the woman who used to do Davey's -- she had a family who wouldn't read Pilgrim's Progress (HUH?) and another family who wouldn't read The Screwtape Letters. I'm learning from those experiences and I'll make it clear what books we are reading ahead of time and they can self-select whether they want to be in our group or not.

    But anyway -- just a warning about Orphan Train ... I loved it but remember that there was one pretty disagreeable, judgmental, stereotypical character, and she was the "religious" one. It's a very small part of the book, but it may may not go over well.

    Have you gone to the Progeny Press website? Davey's old teacher used those guides and that was a great list of books. They did a poetry unit that was really good, I remember.

    Jane Eyre? Pride and Prejudice? Fahrenheit 451?


    Quote Originally Posted by Paige P View Post
    Ladies, can ya'll please help me?

    I need some opinions and maybe some options .....
    So I'm doing this Am. Lit book club, and it's for a group of about 7 or 8 high school girls, freshmen through seniors. There's one family in particular who is VERY sensitive about what they read (they stopped the Crucible mid-way through because they don't read about witches, etc., and they didn't realize it was all a hoax, and it scared her dds). I was going to try to do some more modern books, but I haven't read them, and as I've read reviews, there are at least 4 of them that deal with r@pe, incest, "coming" s@xuality, etc. I just don't think that especially the younger set are ready for that, and I do NOT think that that is the "common" experience for most people, especially this group of teens. So I'm looking for some other books that are/will be considered "classic" American Lit. I don't mind a bit of language, but I don't want just the "old, white men" books (Moby Dick, Cooper, Faulkner -- blah). We've read several plays, and they're tired of that, and so am I.
    Any suggestions/thoughts?

    I'm nixing The House on Mango Street for now until I can completely read it -- I checked commonsensemedia, and I just think it's too much for the "younger" crowd
    And now I'm doubting many things on my list

    Can ya'll please give me some ideas? I'm fine with some language, but I'm not fine with the "growing up because of s*xual encounters" theme.
    Thoughts? Ideas?

    I think I'm going to re-read The Orphan Train -- I think they'd enjoy that. Of course, it's been years since I'd read it, too ....

    They're reading Huck Finn over Christmas. I'm definitely also doing
    The Glass Menagerie
    Their Eyes Were Watching God
    A Raisin in the Sun
    Death of a Salesman?

    What else might they LIKE?

    Thanks for your help!
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  9. #9
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    Rebe, it's definitely difficult when you're dealing with more "opinionated" hsing parents who CARE what their kids read There are some things I'm "warning" about (language, some themes) and then am letting the parents decide. I'm not a "liberal" parent by any means, but I'm not obsessively conservative, either. I knew this other family didn't do "witches," but I also knew the entire historical context and thought it would be okay -- unfortunately, the mom didn't realize HOW to explain it to her kids. Oh well. I don't mind if people don't like ALL of my choices. You can't please everyone all the time, BUT I would like more books for "everyone" than not. I know some "might" be concerned with the language in A Raisin in the Sun, but it's not overboard, and the book as a whole is worth it.

    Thanks for the thoughts -- we're strictly doing Am. Lit (most of these girls are taking an Am. Lit class and are using Abeka Lit book in class, so there are no novels associated with it I WANT my kids to have the novels and group discussions, so I'm doing the book club.) F 451 would work, but at least half of these girls had my class last year, and we read that for class.

    I think this is why I don't really enjoy Am. Lit very much -- as an English major (and 2 graduate degrees in English related fields), I think I only had 2 Am. lit classes. I took lots of Brit Lit and plays and poetry. Am. Lit is just not my favorite, and I want the girls to ENJOY what we're doing. SO hard......
    Wife to Jim and Mama to Katie (1/01), Mattie (9/02), Cale (4/05), and Ben (8/08)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paige P View Post
    Rebe, it's definitely difficult when you're dealing with more "opinionated" hsing parents who CARE what their kids read There are some things I'm "warning" about (language, some themes) and then am letting the parents decide. I'm not a "liberal" parent by any means, but I'm not obsessively conservative, either. I knew this other family didn't do "witches," but I also knew the entire historical context and thought it would be okay -- unfortunately, the mom didn't realize HOW to explain it to her kids. Oh well. I don't mind if people don't like ALL of my choices. You can't please everyone all the time, BUT I would like more books for "everyone" than not. I know some "might" be concerned with the language in A Raisin in the Sun, but it's not overboard, and the book as a whole is worth it.

    Thanks for the thoughts -- we're strictly doing Am. Lit (most of these girls are taking an Am. Lit class and are using Abeka Lit book in class, so there are no novels associated with it I WANT my kids to have the novels and group discussions, so I'm doing the book club.) F 451 would work, but at least half of these girls had my class last year, and we read that for class.

    I think this is why I don't really enjoy Am. Lit very much -- as an English major (and 2 graduate degrees in English related fields), I think I only had 2 Am. lit classes. I took lots of Brit Lit and plays and poetry. Am. Lit is just not my favorite, and I want the girls to ENJOY what we're doing. SO hard......
    I missed the Am Lit part. How about A Tree Grows in Brooklyn?
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

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