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Thread: Moms' Book Thread ~ Week 2 (January 7th - January 13th)

  1. #11
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    Apr 2009
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    I finished Astragal by Albertine Sarrazin.

    She has a very fresh, immediate voice in this book, a semi-autobiographical look at "Anne" who leaps from a third floor to escape prison, shatters her ankle, is randomly (& luckily) picked up by a minor crook (Julien) before her escape is discovered & wanders between hideouts, waiting, healing, & reverting back to her old life (yet at such a young age) of prostitution & thievery. There is freedom of spirit here, but also a lot of hiding, looking over her shoulder (not wanting to be caught), & waiting (sometimes too long) for erstwhile savior & lover Julien. Free & yet never really free.

    A fascinating & fresh account from the '60s.

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

  2. #12
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    Feb 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jill in Monrovia View Post
    I've never been to a book club before. Thought I would try it.
    Jill, how exciting to be in a book club! I haven't been in one either.

    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    I am reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. It has been on my TBR list for a long time, and I find it alternately poignant, sad, and occasionally boring. I do think that the information and history in this book are important to know.
    My book club will be discussing The Lake House by Kate Morton later this month. I am trying to figure out for the life of my if I have read it or not! I seem to recall that several people on this thread had read it and the consensus was that it was not as good as The House at Riverton. I do think I've read it...
    Kathleen, I'm in the minority in that I didn't like "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" at all. I read it several years ago and had high expectations, since everyone I knew loved it. I remember being bored and couldn't wait for it to end.
    I haven't read "The Lake House" either. I thought that you had . Oh well, I guess I got confused with everyone else who's read it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stacia View Post
    I finished Astragal by Albertine Sarrazin.
    She has a very fresh, immediate voice in this book, a semi-autobiographical look at "Anne" who leaps from a third floor to escape prison, shatters her ankle, is randomly (& luckily) picked up by a minor crook (Julien) before her escape is discovered & wanders between hideouts, waiting, healing, & reverting back to her old life (yet at such a young age) of prostitution & thievery. There is freedom of spirit here, but also a lot of hiding, looking over her shoulder (not wanting to be caught), & waiting (sometimes too long) for erstwhile savior & lover Julien. Free & yet never really free.
    A fascinating & fresh account from the '60s.
    Stacia, glad that you enjoyed it. Wow. She went through a lot.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  3. #13
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    Jul 2012
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    Central Virginia
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    While I didn't mind reading Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, I too agree that much of it was boring! It does contain a lot of important info as well, though, so that made it worthwhile. We got to hear Rebecca Skloot speak at our campus the year we read that book, and that was interesting. Since Lacks originated from VA, and the HeLa cell line is stored at our medical campus, there is also a lot of local relevance. I think helped make it more compelling for me when reading. She just needed a good edit for some sections!

    I had time for one more "fun read" last week, so I read The Agatha Christie Book Club. Don't laugh! I almost didn't, because I was afraid it would be WAYYY too over the top. It wasn't actually bad, though--esp. if you don't have very high expectations to begin with. The premise was fun--the mystery was based on a real event in Agatha Christie's own life, and while the "sleuthing" wasn't always believable, it was a fun ride. I may actually read one or more of the subsequent books in the series next time I need a bit of "brain candy"!

    Meanwhile, I'm still plugging through The City and the City. You guys, I need to stop complaining about this book--I'm sorry! But it just drags on and on...if I didn't *have* to read it for work, I would definitely have tossed it aside by now (actually, I would never have picked it up in the first place!) I've decided as of today that I'm going to skim the rest. I can't take it any more! Ok--I promise not to mention this book again.
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (10) & Madelyn (9).

  4. #14
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    Feb 2007
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    MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki P in VA View Post
    I had time for one more "fun read" last week, so I read The Agatha Christie Book Club. Don't laugh! I almost didn't, because I was afraid it would be WAYYY too over the top. It wasn't actually bad, though--esp. if you don't have very high expectations to begin with. The premise was fun--the mystery was based on a real event in Agatha Christie's own life, and while the "sleuthing" wasn't always believable, it was a fun ride. I may actually read one or more of the subsequent books in the series next time I need a bit of "brain candy"!
    Haven't heard of that one, but I just requested it through ILL. It sounds fun. I saw recently that Murder on the Orient Express is on the NYT bestseller list -- that made me happy! Also, after seeing the new movie, we just watched the 1970s version with Albert Finney. Closer to the book -- both were really good movies, I think. We're going to rewatch the David Suchet version soon, just to see them all close together. I want to see the new one once more before it leaves the theatre, to see it on the big screen (our home TV is tiny by today's standards).

    Sue Grafton's A is for Alibi came in for me today, and I only have it for 2 weeks, so that'll be my next book. I hope I like it, but realize that if I really like it, I have 24 more books to go in that series...
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 21 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  5. #15
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    Feb 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki P in VA View Post
    I had time for one more "fun read" last week, so I read The Agatha Christie Book Club.
    Meanwhile, I'm still plugging through The City and the City. You guys, I need to stop complaining about this book--I'm sorry! But it just drags on and on...if I didn't *have* to read it for work, I would definitely have tossed it aside by now (actually, I would never have picked it up in the first place!) I've decided as of today that I'm going to skim the rest. I can't take it any more! Ok--I promise not to mention this book again.
    Vicki, "The Agatha Christie Book Club" sounds like fun. You definitely deserve fun with "The City and the City". Feel free to mention it again and again. We don't mind!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    Haven't heard of that one, but I just requested it through ILL. It sounds fun. I saw recently that Murder on the Orient Express is on the NYT bestseller list -- that made me happy! Also, after seeing the new movie, we just watched the 1970s version with Albert Finney. Closer to the book -- both were really good movies, I think. We're going to rewatch the David Suchet version soon, just to see them all close together. I want to see the new one once more before it leaves the theatre, to see it on the big screen (our home TV is tiny by today's standards).
    Sue Grafton's A is for Alibi came in for me today, and I only have it for 2 weeks, so that'll be my next book. I hope I like it, but realize that if I really like it, I have 24 more books to go in that series...
    Rebe, I also want to see "Murder on the Orient Express".
    I haven't read any Sue Grafton books yet. Sadly, she just passed away the other day.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  6. #16
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    Feb 2007
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    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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