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Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 23 (June 3 - June 9)

  1. #11
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    After a light little children's Lamplighter book last week (A 'Strordinary Little Maid), I'm now switching gears quite dramatically to A Child of Hitler, which my son read for 10th grade English last year. This is the true story of a man who rose to the top ranks of the Hitler Youth as a boy. I'm early in the book, so he's discussing Hitler's rise in Germany, on promises of returning Germany to its rightful place after a crushing blow in WWI. He was a godlike figure and schools were dedicated to indoctrinating children from age 5 or 6 to prepare for unquestioning service to Hitler. This is a rare first-person account from a truly astounding point of view.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Negin View Post

    Michele, sorry that "The Boat People" was so painful. .
    Oh Negin, you're so sweet. Totally not being political, just being human, it just pains me to think of the missing children here and families being ripped apart...
    IN THE END, ONLY KINDNESS MATTERS
    Mom to 5 girls and 5 furry kids too
    21 Years Homeschooling and still learning

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Negin View Post
    Vicki, I hope that you do get to visit Tuscany someday, hopefully soon!
    Sorry that "The Austen Escape" is frustrating. I can relate to being drawn to certain books. I do that from time to time also and then I question myself.
    Thanks, Negin! The big question is, can I justify going on my own, or do I do the "nice" thing, and take my family as well? Actually The Austen Escape hasn't been as bad so far, thankfully. Her others all ended up being irritating to me, which is why I keep telling myself I should stop reading them! Maybe 5th time's a charm? We'll see.
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (11) & Madelyn (9).

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    Remember when Amazon had a bunch of freebies recently for World Book Day? I've started and discarded two of those: The Light of the Fireflies by Paul Pen and Still Waters by Viveca Sten. Fireflies is kind of dark and overly obtuse. Still Waters reads like a made for TV crime story. I gave each a chance but neither grabbed me. I'd be interested to hearing reactions to any of the World Book Day selections that any of you read. You may feel very different about the two books I mentioned!
    Kathleen, I've read A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea by Masaji Ishikawa. Wow. Tragic sounds like such a tiny adjective in comparison to what is described. I have to wonder what he (the author) & others like him (who have managed to escape) think of the current state of relations between North/South Korea & America's involvement in it? Are they hopeful? Cynical? Burned?

    And, I started but did not finish The Great Passage by Shion Miura. I read about 20% but I found the writing stilted & flat.

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

  5. #15
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    I’m having another one of those weeks where 2 e-books that have been on hold for awhile, suddenly came in and an ILL I just requested last week came in. So I’m going between Fairy-Tale Girl by Susan Branch, Snobs by Julian Fellowes, My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante (actually I’m not too interested in this one), and We Were the Lucky Ones (the due date is ticking but I’ve only read a few pages). I decided not to finish A Thousand Days in Tuscany but I might look through it at the recipes. The story was just not holding my interest.
    Wife to David for almost 42 years, mom to 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of 19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    I'm late to the thread because the internet was out in my area for a long time yesterday. Oh the humanity! How are we to live without internet?
    Remember when Amazon had a bunch of freebies recently for World Book Day? I've started and discarded two of those: The Light of the Fireflies by Paul Pen and Still Waters by Viveca Sten. Fireflies is kind of dark and overly obtuse. Still Waters reads like a made for TV crime story. I gave each a chance but neither grabbed me. I'd be interested to hearing reactions to any of the World Book Day selections that any of you read. You may feel very different about the two books I mentioned!
    Next up for me is The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn. A friend read it in her book club and couldn't put it down. I have no idea what to expect from the book, so I'll let you know what I think as I dig in.
    Kathleen, I smiled at your comment about no internet .
    Sorry that the World Book Day books haven't been good. I don't know when I'll get around to reading the ones I got. Honestly, I have so many books on my Kindle, I wouldn't even remember which ones they were.
    Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on "The Woman in the Window". Most of my Good Reads friends seem to have liked it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    After a light little children's Lamplighter book last week (A 'Strordinary Little Maid), I'm now switching gears quite dramatically to A Child of Hitler, which my son read for 10th grade English last year. This is the true story of a man who rose to the top ranks of the Hitler Youth as a boy. I'm early in the book, so he's discussing Hitler's rise in Germany, on promises of returning Germany to its rightful place after a crushing blow in WWI. He was a godlike figure and schools were dedicated to indoctrinating children from age 5 or 6 to prepare for unquestioning service to Hitler. This is a rare first-person account from a truly astounding point of view.
    Rebe, wow. That definitely sounds interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    Oh Negin, you're so sweet. Totally not being political, just being human, it just pains me to think of the missing children here and families being ripped apart...


    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki P in VA View Post
    Thanks, Negin! The big question is, can I justify going on my own, or do I do the "nice" thing, and take my family as well? Actually The Austen Escape hasn't been as bad so far, thankfully. Her others all ended up being irritating to me, which is why I keep telling myself I should stop reading them! Maybe 5th time's a charm? We'll see.
    Glad to hear that "The Austen Escape" hasn't been too bad. Sounds like some of the travel-themed books that I read before trips. They're seldom as good as other books on my to-read list, but I just love to read about places we're going to visit. My daughter says that I need to stop doing this to myself .
    Since I've been married, I've never traveled alone, so I can't say, but I have to say, that even though the family can be a pain at times , I would take traveling with them any day. The shared memories and the closeness that usually results from all that - I can't even begin to describe. It usually boils down to the question of money. I say, if one can afford it, I prefer to travel with the family. Also, it depends on the ages of the kids. We didn't begin to do serious trips to Europe until the kids were in their teens. We know that we won't be able to do this forever, so we're trying to enjoy it while we can. Taking it one day at a time sort of mentality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    I’m having another one of those weeks where 2 e-books that have been on hold for awhile, suddenly came in and an ILL I just requested last week came in. So I’m going between Fairy-Tale Girl by Susan Branch, Snobs by Julian Fellowes, My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante (actually I’m not too interested in this one), and We Were the Lucky Ones (the due date is ticking but I’ve only read a few pages). I decided not to finish A Thousand Days in Tuscany but I might look through it at the recipes. The story was just not holding my interest.
    Joy, I loved "Fairy Tale Girl" as I do all of the Susan Branch books.
    I couldn't get into "Snobs" at all. This was a few years ago.
    I regret ever spending time on the Elena Ferrante series. What a waste of reading time!
    Marlena Blasi is not my favorite by any means. She falls into Vicki's "Austen" type books - the type where I don't know why I do this to myself, why I spend time reading that stuff. I gave it 2 Stars.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stacia View Post
    Kathleen, I've read A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea by Masaji Ishikawa. Wow. Tragic sounds like such a tiny adjective in comparison to what is described. I have to wonder what he (the author) & others like him (who have managed to escape) think of the current state of relations between North/South Korea & America's involvement in it? Are they hopeful? Cynical? Burned?
    And, I started but did not finish The Great Passage by Shion Miura. I read about 20% but I found the writing stilted & flat.
    Sorry that "The Great Passage" was disappointing.
    The best, absolute best book that I've read on North Korea (so far) has been "Nothing to Envy".
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stacia View Post
    Kathleen, I've read A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea by Masaji Ishikawa. Wow. Tragic sounds like such a tiny adjective in comparison to what is described. I have to wonder what he (the author) & others like him (who have managed to escape) think of the current state of relations between North/South Korea & America's involvement in it? Are they hopeful? Cynical? Burned?

    And, I started but did not finish The Great Passage by Shion Miura. I read about 20% but I found the writing stilted & flat.
    Well, between tragic and stilted & flat, I'll take your word for it! Not in the mood for either!

    Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on "The Woman in the Window". Most of my Good Reads friends seem to have liked it.
    Negin, so far it is good! The main character has agoraphobia, but the book is not coming off as dark and depressing even though this character has clear challenges. One positive secondary character who is emerging is a homeschooled teen!
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    Negin, so far it is good! The main character has agoraphobia, but the book is not coming off as dark and depressing even though this character has clear challenges. One positive secondary character who is emerging is a homeschooled teen!
    Adding it to my list .
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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