Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25

Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 27 (July 1st - July 7th)

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,260

    Default

    Happy Monday Bookworms! Negin...I love your perspective on genius. Very thought provoking. Thank you! Vicki, CONGRATS on completing your research project!!!! I'm hoping that you get lots of time to get dirt under your nails and flip pages of books. Julia, I'm also on the waiting list for The Color of Bee Larkham's Murder. I'm so glad that you're enjoying it. Last week I read A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. I highly recommend this book. I just couldn't put it down! This is a quiet book which speaks volumes. Fitting in, finding one's identity, family, love ...I don't think that I can adequately describe the depth and intimacy this new author is able to gently share with the reader. TWO THUMBS UP and..that's saying quite a lot since the book before this was Fredrik Backman's newest novel, Us Against You. Gosh, the library fairies have been very sweet to me lately!! I'm currently reading The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer. Happy reading everyone. My oldest daughter (and her boyfriend) are coming to town for a few days (WAA HOO! She has a few days off from grad school). I just can't wait to hug her!! Happy July everyone. Can you believe that the year is half way over? WOWSA!!!
    IN THE END, ONLY KINDNESS MATTERS
    Mom to 5 girls and 5 furry kids too
    20 Years Homeschooling and still learning

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Negin View Post
    Vicki, that's wonderful that you finished your research project!
    "The Layered Garden" and all that gardening sound lovely. I wonder if my son would like it. I know that he would. He's recently been into gardening. I'm not sure if I should get it or not. Our climate here is different. If you ever hear or see any books that may be applicable to tropical gardening, do please let me know. Thanks so much!
    The Cluny Brown book looks delightful.
    Thanks, Negin! The book has a lot of good design ideas, so if that's his thing, it still might work. But the pictures are all of the author's home in PA, which is modeled on the cottage garden style--not very tropical at all. So if you think something with more relevant planting ideas would be helpful, this might not be the best option.

    If he is interested in veg gardening, a few books I've loved (and earmarked many pages in!) are Betty Crocker's Kitchen Gardens and Mel Bartholemew's Square Foot Gardening--a classic! Most of the ornamental gardening books I read have to do with Cottage Gardens, so I don't have any others along those to recommend at the moment.

    However, if you think he might like to watch a garden show, I've been binge-watching a BBC show called Gardener's World all summer, and found episodes going back to 2006 on youtube. (Actually further back, as it has been on a long time--but I was specifically looking for the ones featuring Monty Don as host, because he's fantastic.) It's been like taking a gardening class--I've learned so many new ideas! And they do talk about tropical plants on there from time to time. But even if the plants are different, the tips will always be relevant.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    Happy Monday Bookworms! Negin...I love your perspective on genius. Very thought provoking. Thank you! Vicki, CONGRATS on completing your research project!!!! I'm hoping that you get lots of time to get dirt under your nails and flip pages of books. Julia, I'm also on the waiting list for The Color of Bee Larkham's Murder. I'm so glad that you're enjoying it. Last week I read A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. I highly recommend this book. I just couldn't put it down! This is a quiet book which speaks volumes. Fitting in, finding one's identity, family, love ...I don't think that I can adequately describe the depth and intimacy this new author is able to gently share with the reader. TWO THUMBS UP and..that's saying quite a lot since the book before this was Fredrik Backman's newest novel, Us Against You. Gosh, the library fairies have been very sweet to me lately!! I'm currently reading The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer. Happy reading everyone. My oldest daughter (and her boyfriend) are coming to town for a few days (WAA HOO! She has a few days off from grad school). I just can't wait to hug her!! Happy July everyone. Can you believe that the year is half way over? WOWSA!!!
    Thank you, Michele! It feels good. Now on to the next thing...
    Last edited by Vicki P in VA; 07-02-2018 at 12:37 PM.
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (11) & Madelyn (9).

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,023

    Default

    Wow, Negin, I would love to sit down with you and talk for hours about that book on genius - or the concepts from it. Fascinating. I really like what you said about "a culture cultivates what it values." Isn't that true? I'd have to disagree with the author's comment that "it takes a city to raise a genius," though. Not true at all - but maybe I have a different opinion of "genius" than he did.
    Totally agree with what Rebe said here! That book sounds like it has some compelling fodder for thought and discussion.

    I love reading what everyone has to say - even if I don't reply to all. You all inspire me!

    More light reading for Kathleen... Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. I believe it may be YA, and is just a fun story to get lost in. It is set in 1986 and has some fun music and cultural references. It's one of those star-crossed-first-love stories with a dose of sweetness and complications to keep it interesting. No cheesy writing thus far, so it is a great summer read for me, and easy to pick up here and there throughout the day for doses of escapism.

    Lest you think I am totally letting my brain rot away, I am preparing for a job this fall as a part time Latin teacher for the elementary grades at my church's school. I've been brushing up on my long-neglected Latin (not too tough considering I'm spent the better part of my life learning Romance languages.) I'm frontloading lesson plans and even reading about classroom management. If you are in the need for a good classroom management resource, I recommend Tools for Teaching by Fred Jones. Get an older edition or a used copy for a better price and check related YouTube videos. Lots of great nuts and bolts tips!
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    4,091

    Default

    Have any of you read The Well Educated Mind by Susan Wise Bauer? I thought I would work on my education in my old age so I just bought this. It looks pretty good. Basically, it’s how to read a book and has a booklist.
    Wife to David, mom to 9, homeschooling Abby (15). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons! Homeschooling since 1986, Rowing since 2000.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3,693

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    Last week I read A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. I highly recommend this book. I just couldn't put it down! This is a quiet book which speaks volumes. Fitting in, finding one's identity, family, love ...I don't think that I can adequately describe the depth and intimacy this new author is able to gently share with the reader. TWO THUMBS UP and..that's saying quite a lot since the book before this was Fredrik Backman's newest novel, Us Against You. Gosh, the library fairies have been very sweet to me lately!! I'm currently reading The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer. Happy reading everyone. My oldest daughter (and her boyfriend) are coming to town for a few days (WAA HOO! She has a few days off from grad school). I just can't wait to hug her!! Happy July everyone. Can you believe that the year is half way over? WOWSA!!!
    Michele, so happy to hear that you've had some wonderful reading and that your daughter will be visiting soon!

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki P in VA View Post
    Thanks, Negin! The book has a lot of good design ideas, so if that's his thing, it still might work. But the pictures are all of the author's home in PA, which is modeled on the cottage garden style--not very tropical at all. So if you think something with more relevant planting ideas would be helpful, this might not be the best option.
    If he is interested in veg gardening, a few books I've loved (and earmarked many pages in!) are Betty Crocker's Kitchen Gardens and Mel Bartholemew's Square Foot Gardening--a classic! Most of the ornamental gardening books I read have to do with Cottage Gardens, so I don't have any others along those to recommend at the moment.
    However, if you think he might like to watch a garden show, I've been binge-watching a BBC show called Gardener's World all summer, and found episodes going back to 2006 on youtube. (Actually further back, as it has been on a long time--but I was specifically looking for the ones featuring Monty Don as host, because he's fantastic.) It's been like taking a gardening class--I've learned so many new ideas! And they do talk about tropical plants on there from time to time. But even if the plants are different, the tips will always be relevant.
    Vicki, this is all so helpful. Thank you . I'm bookmarking all your suggestions.

    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    Totally agree with what Rebe said here! That book sounds like it has some compelling fodder for thought and discussion.
    I love reading what everyone has to say - even if I don't reply to all. You all inspire me!
    More light reading for Kathleen... Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. I believe it may be YA, and is just a fun story to get lost in. It is set in 1986 and has some fun music and cultural references. It's one of those star-crossed-first-love stories with a dose of sweetness and complications to keep it interesting. No cheesy writing thus far, so it is a great summer read for me, and easy to pick up here and there throughout the day for doses of escapism.
    Lest you think I am totally letting my brain rot away, I am preparing for a job this fall as a part time Latin teacher for the elementary grades at my church's school. I've been brushing up on my long-neglected Latin (not too tough considering I'm spent the better part of my life learning Romance languages.) I'm frontloading lesson plans and even reading about classroom management. If you are in the need for a good classroom management resource, I recommend Tools for Teaching by Fred Jones. Get an older edition or a used copy for a better price and check related YouTube videos. Lots of great nuts and bolts tips!
    Kathleen, I've seen "Eleanor and Park" come up often on my Good Reads feed.
    Your upcoming job sounds wonderful. I would love to take the time to learn more languages, especially Latin. And how nice that you're teaching the elementary grades. Those are the grades that I like most of all. Nima and I spend a few hours with some elementary kids once a week - tutoring them, etc. Obviously, your work is far more involved than what we do. I just love that age group.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    Have any of you read The Well Educated Mind by Susan Wise Bauer? I thought I would work on my education in my old age so I just bought this. It looks pretty good. Basically, it’s how to read a book and has a booklist.
    Joy, I've gone back and forth on whether I should read it or not. On the one hand, I'm sure that she'll have great suggestions. On the other hand, I worry that I might get a bit stressed from all those lists and suggestions. I'm the type that gets unnecessarily stressed enough as it is. I'm undecided. I'd love to hear from you if you decide to read it.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    8,346

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Negin View Post
    Joy, I've gone back and forth on whether I should read it or not. On the one hand, I'm sure that she'll have great suggestions. On the other hand, I worry that I might get a bit stressed from all those lists and suggestions. I'm the type that gets unnecessarily stressed enough as it is. I'm undecided. I'd love to hear from you if you decide to read it.
    I feel about the same as Negin. SWB stresses me out. If you do read it, Joy, please report back on it, because that may inspire me to pick it up (or not).

    I have something to add about Prairie Fires - the author doesn't seem to have an overt agenda (thankfully), but as with all authors, she is coming from a particular point of view, however subtle. This author sees LIW and her daughter through the lens of their family poverty, for sure. It's all about that - and I understand that emphasis, having grown up in poverty myself, how that affects every aspect of your life forevermore, whether you want it to or not and whether you overcome it or not. So that's very interesting - but also interesting is the political turmoil at the time LIW was writing her books. I really had no idea - I just learned about the Dust Bowl and the Depression and FDR's New Deal as history, without learning about how thoroughly opposed many, many people were (especially rural folks, but also many newspapers, etc.) to FDR, the name-calling, accusations, fears, etc. Somehow I missed this completely in learning about this time period. So this is extremely interesting given our current political situation, our current president, our current newspapers and news media, our current rural/urban divide, and the renewed interest in socialist or democratic socialist candidates. It's all really interesting, and reminds me that there is nothing new under the sun.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to United States Marine ds 22 * artist dd 19 * motion-loving ds 16 * piano-playing ds 11
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,023

    Default

    I feel about the same as Negin. SWB stresses me out. If you do read it, Joy, please report back on it, because that may inspire me to pick it up (or not).
    Agreed with Rebe and Negin! SWB really turned me off to the Classical Education at first!
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    396

    Default

    As usual, I am in the minority. I read WEM 15 years ago when my oldest was 4 yrs old. I was researching homeschooling/classical education when I came upon this book. This book encouraged me to self-educate while I Educated my children. I learned how to critically read a book from WEM.

    There are lists of books but there is also a section on how to read a book. Those lists did not stress me out, I just chose the ones that interested me. That is how I view WTM as well; I took what worked for me and my family and left the rest. I am very thankful to SWB and her books; they introduced me to homeschooling and classical education. Her books were the beginning steps of a wonderful journey.
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (18), ds (17) and dd (15)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Sorry--not a book related post.

    Negin, I had to jump back on here and share this: I was watching an episode of the show I mentioned earlier this week (Gardener's World), and they featured some gardens in Barbados. Gorgeous tropical plants--right up your alley! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDentGLSW8A
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (11) & Madelyn (9).

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,023

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaT View Post
    As usual, I am in the minority. I read WEM 15 years ago when my oldest was 4 yrs old. I was researching homeschooling/classical education when I came upon this book. This book encouraged me to self-educate while I Educated my children. I learned how to critically read a book from WEM.

    There are lists of books but there is also a section on how to read a book. Those lists did not stress me out, I just chose the ones that interested me. That is how I view WTM as well; I took what worked for me and my family and left the rest. I am very thankful to SWB and her books; they introduced me to homeschooling and classical education. Her books were the beginning steps of a wonderful journey.
    I wish I had had that wisdom to glean and choose in my early homeschool years! I let myself get stressed by other people's lists and priorities!

    On another note, I finished Eleanor and Park... meh. It was at first a little addictive in the fun summer read sense, then it bogged down. The ending is unclear. People have tried to pin the author down about it online, and she says she's not completely sure either! It appears to have been written to allow for a sequel that may never happen. Moving along...
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •