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Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 28 (July 8th - July 1st - July 14th)

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    Default Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 28 (July 8th - July 1st - July 14th)

    I hope that it’s been a wonderful reading week for all.

    I read The New Church Ladies: The Extremely Uptight World of Social Justice - 3 Stars - I’ve been hesitant to post a review of this book, since I’m sure that I’ll offend many. First, the fact that I even read this book will hit a nerve. Then, the fact that I’m reviewing it, oh, the outrage.

    I really dislike political correctness. If you happen to have drunk the PC Kool-Aid, please read no further.

    Years ago, I was an undergrad in one of the first colleges to be involved in the whole stupid politically correct rubbish. I was right there in the thick of it, when all that nonsense started. In one class, we were asked to do a mock interview. To warm things up a bit, we were requested to joke about something, only to realize that the joke part was a trick question. The instructor, a complete idiot in my mind, said she hated jokes. No, not just for the purpose of the mock interview, but she hated jokes overall, since they always end up offending somebody. At the time, I thought, what a sad way to live one’s life. Now, we have an entire generation of college students, who are just like her. They cannot seem to find humor in anything and get offended by the smallest thing. This is why some comedians such as Seinfeld and Chris Rock, now refuse to perform in colleges. Everything is labeled racist, sexist, prejudice, you name it.

    For me, this book was hilarious and insightful, but it’s also obscene, and so I cannot recommend it to anyone. No. Not a single soul. Those who need to read it probably won’t. Everyone will eventually find something in this book that they will find offensive.

    My favorite quote:

    “If you’re really sincere about the idea that diversity is a good thing, you need to quit insisting that everyone should THINK exactly like you do. Unanimity of thought—especially when it’s enforced through speech codes and laws that restrict and criminalize ideological dissent—is not tolerance, it’s totalitarianism. Tolerating different ideas is the most important form of tolerance.”

    I also read None Dare Call it Conspiracy - 3 Stars - This was a thought-provoking read. Although it was quite dated, unfortunately much of it is still relevant today.

    Some interesting quotes:

    “If you have total government it makes little difference whether you call it Communism, Fascism, Socialism, Caesarism or Pharaohism. It's all pretty much the same from the standpoint of the people who must live and suffer under it.”

    “FDR once said ‘In politics, nothing happens by accident. If it happens, you can bet it was planned that way.’”

    “If you study Marx's Communist Manifesto you will find that in essence Marx said the proletarian revolution would establish the SOCIALIST dictatorship of the proletariat. To achieve the SOCIALIST dictatorship of the proletariat, three things would have to be accomplished: (1) The elimination of all right to private property; (2) The dissolution of the family unit; and (3) Destruction of what Marx referred to as the "opiate of the people," religion.”





    MY RATING SYSTEM
    5 Stars
    Fantastic, couldn't put it down
    4 Stars
    Really Good
    3 Stars
    Enjoyable
    2 Stars
    Just Okay – nothing to write home about
    1 Star
    Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    Last edited by Negin; 07-08-2018 at 06:38 AM.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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    Negin, I think my husband would like both your books.

    I’ve been pretty busy this week but I’m reading Northbridge Rectory by Angela Thirkell and listening to Silas Marner, which is for Abby’s Lightning Lit. We are starting school back soon and I thought I would get ahead a little and I like to listen to audio books while I do housework. I don’t think I’ve actually read Silas Marner all the way through. I think we just had excerpts in high school so I’m enjoying it so far.
    Wife to David for almost 42 years, mom to 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of 19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    I’ve been pretty busy this week but I’m reading Northbridge Rectory by Angela Thirkell and listening to Silas Marner, which is for Abby’s Lightning Lit. We are starting school back soon and I thought I would get ahead a little and I like to listen to audio books while I do housework. I don’t think I’ve actually read Silas Marner all the way through. I think we just had excerpts in high school so I’m enjoying it so far.
    Joy, you've just given me a great idea for an audiobook when I get back to commuting--I've read several George Eliot books, but that was one I never got around to, and always felt like I should! Thank you.

    Negin, I 100% agree with your frustration over "pc-ness." I work in a public university, and the "inclusivity and diversity" craze is driving me up the wall! I do feel like "tolerance" is often only offered to a select group of folks who happen to be like-minded, and excludes any who dare to disagree with the current norms of thinking. Not sure I'd like to read an entire book about it--I'd probably just get angry--but can certainly understand your sentiments!

    I'm still working on Cluny Brown, as I was more focused on my nonfiction last week (the gardening book I mentioned was fantastic!). But I'm loving this one as well; I told my daughter that the best way I can describe Cluny Brown is a grown-ups version of Amelia Bedelia. Such fun, and I definitely think I'll seek out more by this author when I need something relaxing to read!
    Mama of two lovely ladies: Carina (11) & Madelyn (9).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    I’ve been pretty busy this week but I’m reading Northbridge Rectory by Angela Thirkell and listening to Silas Marner, which is for Abby’s Lightning Lit. We are starting school back soon and I thought I would get ahead a little and I like to listen to audio books while I do housework. I don’t think I’ve actually read Silas Marner all the way through. I think we just had excerpts in high school so I’m enjoying it so far.
    Joy, if your husband does choose to read them, do please remember that the first book has lots of bad language.
    I'm looking into the Barsetshire series. Looks lovely!

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki P in VA View Post
    Joy, you've just given me a great idea for an audiobook when I get back to commuting--I've read several George Eliot books, but that was one I never got around to, and always felt like I should! Thank you.
    Negin, I 100% agree with your frustration over "pc-ness." I work in a public university, and the "inclusivity and diversity" craze is driving me up the wall! I do feel like "tolerance" is often only offered to a select group of folks who happen to be like-minded, and excludes any who dare to disagree with the current norms of thinking. Not sure I'd like to read an entire book about it--I'd probably just get angry--but can certainly understand your sentiments!
    I'm still working on Cluny Brown, as I was more focused on my nonfiction last week (the gardening book I mentioned was fantastic!). But I'm loving this one as well; I told my daughter that the best way I can describe Cluny Brown is a grown-ups version of Amelia Bedelia. Such fun, and I definitely think I'll seek out more by this author when I need something relaxing to read!
    Vicki, thank you again for all those gardening links. He started watching some of the BBC episodes and said thank you also. I've also ordered a book for him to start him off, but it will be a while before it gets here.
    Smiling at your Amelia Bedelia/Cluny Brown comment.
    Yes, the PC environment in today's university would drive me nuts also. I can't even begin to imagine. It was driving me nuts more than two decades ago. Now it must be way more.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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    Negin, your first book looks good - yes, I might read it - but on the other hand, as Vicki said, it would probably just make me angry (or very, very sad), and I don't need more of that in my life right now. I could say more on this from my own college experience, but won't bore people with it here! But yes, I understand exactly what you are saying.

    I'm currently reading Adorned, by Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth - the woman who sort of "took over" after Elisabeth Elliot retired from her ministry. It's a book on Titus 2 mentoring, mostly from the older woman's perspective, but also speaking to younger women. I'm enjoying it. I find it hard to admit sometimes that I'm rapidly headed toward (or maybe already in) the designation of "older woman." I guess I am, except that I still have younger children at home.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

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    Negin, that was the best book review I've ever read I think!!! It literally made me laugh out loud and...stop and think for a bit. Thank you!! I'm reporting on a fabulous book this week. Less by Andrew Sean Greer is just a delight. It's the tale of a man approaching his fiftieth birthday, invited to a former lovers wedding and mourning the rejection of his current manuscript by his publisher with whom he's had a long standing relationship. The trifecta of doom. Arthur Less decides that he will not go to the wedding but will travel around the world saying yes to opportunities. FABULOUS book. Perhaps I should mention that it won the Pulitzer Prize. I think that we all go through different stages of life and sometimes the transition years (and years leading up to them) are a bit challenging (written by me..a person who is on the cusp of a huge transition and facing the unknown with more than a bit of trepidation). I honestly felt sad leaving the pages of Less. This book may not be a read for everyone. There are few grandiose scenes as Arthur travels but I loved it. I have the latest Elin Hilderbrand book on hold from the library so that may be my next read. Happy page turning friends. Sending well wishes.
    IN THE END, ONLY KINDNESS MATTERS
    Mom to 5 girls and 5 furry kids too
    21 Years Homeschooling and still learning

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    Negin, I LOVE your first quote!!! I totally agree with those words.

    Joy, I read Silas Marner during high school and I loved it, so I decided to reread it a few more months ago. I didn't like it as much this time. Usually it's the other way around. I was disappointed.

    Okay, do I dare admit how many books I read this week? I am very sensitive about how many books I read. People around me often insinuate that I read too much. My mother-in-law told me once that I read way more books in my 10 years of living on the farm than she did in her 40 years and it's because she worked. Ouch! So I always feel I need to justify my numbers. I do not read all day but I do get up extremely early to read before the kids wake up, plus I don't watch tv so my evenings are usually spent with books.
    Okay, I will not defend my numbers any more.

    I read 4 books this week: That Night by Chevy Stevens. It was a suspense and it wasn't that great because I can't even remember what it was about.

    The Colours of Bee Larkham's Murder by Sarah Harris. Loved this book!! It is a quirky story with a 13 yr old autistic boy who also has synesthesia (words, sounds are associated with colours.) it is reminiscent of The Curious Incident of the Dog at Night Time but without all of the swearing.

    The Return by Hisham Matar. Matar' father was a political activist in Libya during the Quadafi regime. He was put in jail in 1989 and no one has seen him since. This book is a telling of Matar's Journey in finding out what happened to his father. The middle of the book got a bit boggy in Libyan politics but the rest of the book was very good.

    A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines. I read this for my postal book club. This is an Oprah Book Club Book but I had never heard of it before. It is set in the 40s in Louisiana. A young black man is sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit. i liked this one as well.

    I am currently reading: The Ensemble by Aja Gabel, How to Think by ( I can't remember the first name but the last name is Jacobs) and The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz. I love Horowitz's books. They are quirky and different.
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (19), ds (17) and dd (15)

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    Julia, I have more time than I used to and usually read about 2 books/week. I don’t think you need to defend yourself at all! I adore reading and unless I’m on a movie kick, I don’t usually watch TV.

    Rebe, I adore Nancy Demoss just as much as I adored Eliz Elliott, although I haven’t read anything by her lately. I just gave Abby one of her books on womanhood to read for school, though.

    Michele, I have Less in my list and now I really want to read it! I’m on that same cusp and it sounds like a fun book!
    Wife to David for almost 42 years, mom to 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of 19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    I'm currently reading Adorned, by Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth - the woman who sort of "took over" after Elisabeth Elliot retired from her ministry. It's a book on Titus 2 mentoring, mostly from the older woman's perspective, but also speaking to younger women. I'm enjoying it. I find it hard to admit sometimes that I'm rapidly headed toward (or maybe already in) the designation of "older woman." I guess I am, except that I still have younger children at home.
    Rebe, I hear you on the older woman thing. Same here. We're all headed in that direction. I had an EKG the other day and the nurse asked me my age and then since we're both in our 50's, said, " Welcome to the club!" I would love to hear your college experience, by the way, but I understand you not wishing to share.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    Negin, that was the best book review I've ever read I think!!! It literally made me laugh out loud and...stop and think for a bit. Thank you!! I'm reporting on a fabulous book this week. Less by Andrew Sean Greer is just a delight. It's the tale of a man approaching his fiftieth birthday, invited to a former lovers wedding and mourning the rejection of his current manuscript by his publisher with whom he's had a long standing relationship. The trifecta of doom. Arthur Less decides that he will not go to the wedding but will travel around the world saying yes to opportunities. FABULOUS book. Perhaps I should mention that it won the Pulitzer Prize. I think that we all go through different stages of life and sometimes the transition years (and years leading up to them) are a bit challenging (written by me..a person who is on the cusp of a huge transition and facing the unknown with more than a bit of trepidation). I honestly felt sad leaving the pages of Less. This book may not be a read for everyone. There are few grandiose scenes as Arthur travels but I loved it. I have the latest Elin Hilderbrand book on hold from the library so that may be my next read. Happy page turning friends. Sending well wishes.
    Michele, good to know that I made you laugh . I was nervous when I wrote that review. I started reading that book on one of our flights and there were parts that had me giggling.

    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaT View Post
    Okay, do I dare admit how many books I read this week? I am very sensitive about how many books I read. People around me often insinuate that I read too much. My mother-in-law told me once that I read way more books in my 10 years of living on the farm than she did in her 40 years and it's because she worked. Ouch! So I always feel I need to justify my numbers. I do not read all day but I do get up extremely early to read before the kids wake up, plus I don't watch tv so my evenings are usually spent with books.
    Okay, I will not defend my numbers any more.
    I read 4 books this week: That Night by Chevy Stevens. It was a suspense and it wasn't that great because I can't even remember what it was about.
    The Colours of Bee Larkham's Murder by Sarah Harris. Loved this book!! It is a quirky story with a 13 yr old autistic boy who also has synesthesia (words, sounds are associated with colours.) it is reminiscent of The Curious Incident of the Dog at Night Time but without all of the swearing.
    The Return by Hisham Matar. Matar' father was a political activist in Libya during the Quadafi regime. He was put in jail in 1989 and no one has seen him since. This book is a telling of Matar's Journey in finding out what happened to his father. The middle of the book got a bit boggy in Libyan politics but the rest of the book was very good.
    A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines. I read this for my postal book club. This is an Oprah Book Club Book but I had never heard of it before. It is set in the 40s in Louisiana. A young black man is sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit. i liked this one as well.
    I am currently reading: The Ensemble by Aja Gabel, How to Think by ( I can't remember the first name but the last name is Jacobs) and The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz. I love Horowitz's books. They are quirky and different.
    Julia, I agree with Joy. You never need to defend how many books you read. I love the fact that you read more than I do these days. I live vicariously through you and add so many of your books to my wish list!
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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    Kindle books on sale today. Not the greatest of all sales, but still discounted. These are from the Bronze Horseman series (historical fiction/romance genre). I keep hearing about this series, but I have not yet read them. The following is the correct order.

    Children of Liberty - prequel to the series

    Bellagrand is next - but is not on sale.

    The Bronze Horseman

    Tatiana and Alexander - not on sale
    The Summer Garden - not on sale
    Tatiana's Table - not on sale

    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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