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Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 32 (August 5th - August 11th)

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    Default Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 32 (August 5th - August 11th)

    I hope that it’s been a good reading week for all.

    I read The Force of Reason - 4 Stars - There are a few authors that I would love to meet. Those that come to my immediate mind: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Brigitte Gabriel, and the author of this book, the late Oriana Fallaci.



    Let’s just say that she wasn’t exactly the most loved individual, but she was certainly fascinating and led quite an exciting life. When reading her books or reviewing them, I believe that it’s helpful to know some background information about her life.

    As a teenager in Italy, she fought Nazi-fascism. She would cycle around the hills of Tuscany, delivering messages and transporting explosives in her bike, hiding them in a basket among lettuce and other vegetables. Then later as a war reporter, she covered major conflicts throughout the world and interviewed many public figures. She was probably the only Western journalist to have interviewed Ayatollah Khomeini twice. I love how she called the chador, “a stupid, medieval rag”.



    She also interviewed Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali), whom she walked out on after he rudely belched in her face; Yasir Arafat, whom she despised; and Qaddafi, whom she also hated.



    She spent her final years, while succumbing to cancer, between her native Tuscany and New York City. The U.S. was her adopted homeland and she loved it dearly. “The Force of Reason” is the second in a trilogy of books that she wrote following the horrific 9/11 attacks. She was living in Manhattan during that time.

    I have seldom seen an author write with such inflammatory passion and intensity. I think that it’s the Italian in her. Anyway, I have to say that I love it. In this book, she continues her rant about Western values being under attack by those on the left, specifically those who are anti-Western and pro-Islamic – the politically correct elite. For me, it is so refreshing to see that I am not alone with regards to my thoughts on all this. Oftentimes, I believe that there are few who seem to care. Most people that I know seem to have buried their heads in the sand and think that I’m off my rocker. For that reason, I’ve learned to stay quiet.

    Oriana addresses the truth about history in Europe during the time of the Muslim invasion and the Crusaders. She says it like it is, as opposed to some romantic version of a time when everyone supposedly lived in a time of tolerance, harmony, and peaceful coexistence.

    “Whoever believes in the myth of ‘peaceful coexistence that marked the relationships between the conquered and the conquerors’ should reread the stories of the burned convents and monasteries, of the profaned churches, of the raped nuns, of the Christian or Jewish women abducted to be locked away in their harems. He should ponder on the crucifixions of Cordoba, the hangings of Granada, the beheadings of Toledo and Barcelona, of Seville and Zamora. (The beheadings of Seville, ordered by Mutamid: the king who used those severed heads, heads of Jews and Christians, to adorn his palace). Invoking the name of Jesus meant instant execution. Crucifixion, of course, or decapitation or hanging or impalement. Ringing a bell, the same. Wearing green, the colour of Islam, also. And when a Muslim passed by, every Jew and Christian was obliged to step aside. To bow. And mind to the Jew or the Christian who dared react to the insults of a Muslim. As for the much-flaunted detail that the infidel-dogs were not obliged to convert to Islam, not even encouraged to do so, do you know why they were not? Because those who converted to Islam did not pay taxes. Those who refused, on the contrary, did.”



    She also describes the similarities between the fascism under Hitler and Mussolini and the growing radical Islamic movement of today, especially in Europe. She calls it “Eurabia”, and vehemently criticizes the cowardice and spinelessness of Europe. She criticized what she saw as a double standard:

    “If you speak your mind on the Vatican, on the Catholic Church, on the Pope, on the Virgin Mary or Jesus or the saints, nobody touches your ‘right of thought and expression.’ But if you do the same with Islam, the Koran, the Prophet Muhammad, some son of Allah, you are called a xenophobic blasphemer who has committed an act of racial discrimination.”

    There are plenty of examples and anecdotes, including this one:

    “… the animal rights activist Erwin Kessler who like Brigitte Bardot cannot abide the Muslims practicing to butcher the lambs like Dracula, that is, slowly drawing their blood. For criticizing it, he got two months in prison.”



    As a result of her writing, she made many enemies and received numerous death threats. There were cries of outrage and demands to burn her books.

    Overall, this wasn’t as good as her first book, which I truly loved. Her writing style may be difficult to appreciate at times, since she insisted on translating them herself. It is Italian English and reading it takes a bit of patience. I would only recommend this book for die-hard Oriana fans, like myself.



    I also read The American Miracle - 4 Stars - My knowledge of American history is embarrassingly limited. I did not grow up in the U.S. and when I finally arrived to Oregon as a young college student, my major didn’t require any history courses. I’ve always loved history, but taking it in college didn’t interest me.

    When my husband and I were newlyweds living in Southern California, we would usually go to the movies on the weekends. My husband would often recommend that I look up movie reviews by Michael Medved. I think that he was reviewing movies on PBS at the time. It turns out that he’s also written many books. This is the first one that I have read by him. It’s meticulously researched and although there were a few parts that were a bit on the dry side for me, all in all I enjoyed it immensely.

    It’s an absolutely fascinating and deep theory about how so many events in American history have been the result of the hand of God and were not accidents. He describes specific incidents where God has worked miracles starting with the Pilgrims and ending with Abraham Lincoln. And no, the book does not claim that America is perfect, but after reading this, I realized that it’s a country that’s incredibly blessed with an exceptional history.

    There were two parts that I most loved about this book. One was his amazing description of how he met his wife.



    The other is his reminder that although God has intervened in American history, Americans should have act nobly and have an attitude of gratitude and humility. In other words, they should not forget how blessed they are, what a truly exceptional and unique country they have, and finally, they should remember to honor Him. I wish that this book would be required reading in high schools or colleges. It would be such an inspiring and refreshing change when compared to all the negativity these days.





    MY RATING SYSTEM
    5 Stars
    Fantastic, couldn't put it down
    4 Stars
    Really Good
    3 Stars
    Enjoyable
    2 Stars
    Just Okay – nothing to write home about
    1 Star
    Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    Last edited by Negin; 08-05-2018 at 05:39 AM.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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    Wow, Negin. I can’t even comment adequately except to say both books sound great! I’m especially interested in the second one because my husband would like it and I always liked Michael Medved’s movie reviews.

    I’ve been reading fluff books, several by an author Steve and Jane recommended, Elizabeth Cadell. I’ve read 3 or 4 and so far, A Lion in the Way has been the best. I also discovered freelibrary.org and have found several from authors I like. I’m almost finished with Silas Marner and I love it! Why have I never read it before?? Finally, I’m about to begin Middlemarch on audio. It’s such a huge book, I thought audio might work better for me.
    Wife to David for almost 42 years, mom to 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of 19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    Wow, Negin. I can’t even comment adequately except to say both books sound great! I’m especially interested in the second one because my husband would like it and I always liked Michael Medved’s movie reviews.

    I’ve been reading fluff books, several by an author Steve and Jane recommended, Elizabeth Cadell. I’ve read 3 or 4 and so far, A Lion in the Way has been the best. I also discovered freelibrary.org and have found several from authors I like. I’m almost finished with Silas Marner and I love it! Why have I never read it before?? Finally, I’m about to begin Middlemarch on audio. It’s such a huge book, I thought audio might work better for me.
    Joy, your husband may really like the Michael Medved book. Again, I wouldn't recommend the first book, except for those who are true Oriana Fallaci fans. Even her first book may be hard to appreciate at times. The writing style and language are quite intense to say the least. She was angry when she wrote it and it shows!

    I haven't read "Silas Marner" or "Middlemarch". Hopefully someday! The Elizabeth Cadell fluff books sound lovely. So happy that you found freelibrary.org! I've never heard of it, but doubt that I'll be able to access it because of where we live.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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    Still engrossed in The Witching Hour by Anne Rice, my guilty pleasure, and still wending my way through Don Quixote.
    Wife to Darrell, mom to John, Patrick, DJ and Ryan, Stepgrandmom of 5, grandmother to Adam, Harper, and Alexander. Done homeschooling but not done learning!

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    Kathleen, thanks so much for your extra info about South American writing & the things in life that my influence it. Both fascinating & scary. So glad you were away from the hotel that had the explosion.

    I'm behind posting, partly because I've had computer troubles lately.

    I did finish the Haruki Murikami book Killing Commendatore. I really enjoyed it. If you're not a Murakami fan, this won't make you one; if you are a Murakami fan, you will be happy. As is typical with Murakami, he used many of his standard themes & items (see Murakami Bingo, lol), just put them together in a different way with a new story.

    Haven't read anything else much since then.

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

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    Hello book friends!

    Negin, I find Oriana Fallaci pretty interesting as well. I read somewhere that she insisted on translating her book to English herself, and that while her English isn't bad at all, it does lack some nuance that would make it a smoother read. Did you find that to be the case?

    It was another fluff read for me this week: Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum. Yes, it was full of YA tropes, and yes, it leaned a little heavily on regional stereotypes, but it was still a fun read and a nice little escape.
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

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    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    Negin, I find Oriana Fallaci pretty interesting as well. I read somewhere that she insisted on translating her book to English herself, and that while her English isn't bad at all, it does lack some nuance that would make it a smoother read. Did you find that to be the case?
    Kathleen, in a nutshell, yes. I loved her first book. Her second book was a more challenging read and one that I would have a hard time recommending to most.

    Kindle books on sale today.

    Young Titan (biography)

    A Mighty Heart (autobiography/memoir)

    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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    After a wonderful weekend celebrating my oldest son's marriage , I'm reading again. I picked up and tried to read both fiction and nonfiction books on my shelf ... and I was uninspired. I finally realized that, now that the wedding is over, my brain is in school mode. I've been not thinking about school all summer - putting it off until "after the wedding." So now that time has come and it turns out that I just can't read anything right now that isn't school related.

    So I picked up a book I bought at our recent convention: Teaching From Rest: A Homeschooler's Guide to Unshakable Peace. This is by the hugely popular Sarah Mackenzie - I know very little about her because her kids are WAY younger than mine, but after reading a few chapters, she seems to me to be very similar to Elizabeth Foss, whom I really like. Pretty sure Mackenzie is Catholic, as well. So far I'm really enjoying the book, even though I'm not sure how much will apply to my stage of life and homeschooling.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

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    Rebe, many congrats to your ds & his new wife. And to you too!

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

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    Rebe, be sure to come back and tell us how you like that book. I’m interested in it....
    Wife to David for almost 42 years, mom to 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of 19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

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