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Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 40 (September 30th- - October 5th)

  1. #1
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    Default Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 40 (September 30th- - October 5th)

    everyone!

    I read The Lord God Made Them All - 5 Stars - I simply love James Herriots’ heartwarming books.

    When my children were small, we read and re-read the children’s version of the Herriot books, a beautifully-illustrated Treasury, which I highly recommend. We all loved the stories, our son especially. Herriot’s descriptions of Yorkshire are so wonderful that he made us want to visit. So a few years ago, on our trip to England, we spent a few nights in Thirsk (known as “Darrowby” in his books) and we visited the Herriot Museum (“The World of James Herriot”). The museum is the actual surgery where the stories take place. We stayed at a cozy little B&B in Thirsk. The owners grew up knowing James Herriott, who lived down the street with his family. They're friends with the Herriott children (not children anymore) and went to school together. We took this picture of the church where James Herriot and his wife got married. It’s just down the street from the Herriot Museum.



    Some of my favorite quotes:
    “I only half realised at the time how lucky I was. I had a demanding, round-the-clock job, and yet I had the company of my children at the same time. So many men work so hard to keep the home going that they lose touch with the families who are at the heart of it, but it never happened to me. Both Jimmy and Rosie, until they went to school, spent most of their time with me round the farms.”

    “Parents are never sure that they have done the right thing. They can only do what they think is right.”

    “’Maybe ye don’t know it, Mr. Herriot, but this is the best time of your life.’ ‘Do you think so?’ ‘Aye, there’s no doubt about it. When your children are young and growin’ up around ye—that’s when it’s best. It’s the same for everybody, only a lot o’ folk don’t know it and a lot find out when it’s too late. It doesn’t last long, you know.’”

    “There are great days ahead!”





    MY RATING SYSTEM
    5 Stars
    The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine.
    4 Stars
    Really Good
    3 Stars
    Enjoyable
    2 Stars
    Just Okay – nothing to write home about
    1 Star
    Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  2. #2
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    Negin, I love James Herriott, too!

    I finished Jayber Crow. 5 stars!

    And I read Stormy Weather by by Paulette Jiles, who wrote one of the best books I’ve read this year, News of the World.
    I loved the story about a family during the time of the Dust Bowl and how they survived and overcame their awful poverty. I think I will give it 4 stars. I liked News of the World slightly better and I discovered she’s written more books so I’ll be looking for those.

    Now I’m reading Caroline by Sarah Miller, a story of Ma, Pa, Laura, and Mary. I’m only on chapter 4, but it’s good so far. Negin, have you read it?
    Wife to David for 42 years, mom of 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of ‘19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

  3. #3
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    I'm working on World War Z. It's my book club's October read. It's a re-read for me. I read it years ago because my friend insisted I would like it; I kept telling her I wouldn't because zombies are not my thing. Eventually I caved & she was right... I did like it. Enjoying it the second time around too.

    We're also planning to watch the movie when we get together.

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy in Alabama View Post
    Negin, I love James Herriott, too!

    I finished Jayber Crow. 5 stars!

    And I read Stormy Weather by by Paulette Jiles, who wrote one of the best books I’ve read this year, News of the World.
    I loved the story about a family during the time of the Dust Bowl and how they survived and overcame their awful poverty. I think I will give it 4 stars. I liked News of the World slightly better and I discovered she’s written more books so I’ll be looking for those.

    Now I’m reading Caroline by Sarah Miller, a story of Ma, Pa, Laura, and Mary. I’m only on chapter 4, but it’s good so far. Negin, have you read it?
    I can ditto everything here - love James Herriot, Jayber Crow (anything Wendell Berry), books about the Dust Bowl (need to look for this one), and Caroline. I loved Caroline, but I know there are some people who were shocked because it includes scenes which they felt were too intimate or weren't fitting with their Little House memories. This is NOT a children's book - but you probably already knew that.

    I am reading pretty much nothing because I'm too busy.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  5. #5
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    Jayber Crow. I have it but I have never read it. I need to go find it.

    I read: I'm Talking as Fast as I Can by Lauren Graham (of Gilmore Girls fame.) For the most part I liked it.
    Demelza by Winston Graham. The second book in the Poldark series. I liked this one, too.
    The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinnin. I wasn't too sure about it in the beginning but it grew on me in a big way. I loved this book! It is a father/daughter relationship story with an edgy twist.

    I am currently reading a smattering of different books :Persuasion by Jane Austen, The Power and the Glory by Grahame Greene, On Writing by Stephen King and Women Talking by Miriam Toews.
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (19), ds (17) and dd (15)

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    I'm reading The Ragged Edge of Night by Olivia Hawker. For the last year or so, I've kept stumbling onto WWII-era fiction, and now I've done it again! It's very good, though. The main character is intriguing.
    Anjie, mom to Laura (22) and Erin (19)
    "Who will I be today: a fool or a teachable sinner?" - Charlie Peacock

  7. #7
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    Hi friends!

    Negin, I loved Herriot books as well. It has been forever since I read one, but they are unforgettable - true classics!

    Stacia, you have me intrigued by World War Z! The movie was pretty insipid, and may be a disappointment to you, but based on your description of the book I'm going to see if I can snag it at my library!

    I read Now that You Mention it by Kristen Higgins. I don't remember how I was directed to that book, but it was very enjoyable. It was a fairly light read that included a few rom-com type tropes, but was overall a great light read and diversion.

    My library loan for A Gentleman in Moscow finally came through, and it does not disappoint! The writing is pure gold, and I find I am growing genuinely fond of several of the characters. It occurs to me that it is what Charlotte Mason might have called a living book. I feel like I am visiting Russia, making friends there, and learning so much that I never encountered in history books. I think that certain aspects of the story are also a warning to the wise about sweeping and radical societal change and unchecked idealism.
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

  8. #8
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    Julia, I read The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley this year & really liked it too.

    Kathleen, from the previews & things I've heard, I think the WWZ movie will be very different than the book. Not sure I'm super-interested in the movie.... Hope you like the book if you do decide to read it. When I read it years ago, I said that if you like geo-political musings (with a rather non-traditional framing of zombies), then you might enjoy the book. (Fun side note -- author Max Brooks is the son of Mel Brooks & Anne Bancroft.)

    I usually read just one book at a time but because I've already read WWZ, I'm chomping at the bit to read some of the other stuff in my book piles too. Today I read David Mitchell's Slade House. Shorter & less intricate than standard David Mitchell fare, yet still entrancing & well done. I really enjoyed it -- slightly creepy but with more literary style & oomph than many books of this genre. This is a fun, eerie little book for October.

    Keep your eyes peeled for a small black iron door.

    Down the road from a working-class British pub, along the brick wall of a narrow alley, if the conditions are exactly right, you’ll find the entrance to Slade House. A stranger will greet you by name and invite you inside. At first, you won’t want to leave. Later, you’ll find that you can’t. Every nine years, the house’s residents—an odd brother and sister—extend a unique invitation to someone who’s different or lonely: a precocious teenager, a recently divorced policeman, a shy college student. But what really goes on inside Slade House? For those who find out, it’s already too late. . . .

    Spanning five decades, from the last days of the 1970s to the present, leaping genres, and barreling toward an astonishing conclusion, this intricately woven novel will pull you into a reality-warping new vision of the haunted house story—as only David Mitchell could imagine it.


    Is anyone planning spooky October reading???

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

  9. #9
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    Hi friends! Another James Herriot fan here. I am doing some spooky October reading. I'm rereading the first 3 Deborah Harkness books so I can read the newly released fourth book. LOL. I've started getting up an hour earlier than usual so I can read books for myself. With three high school students, I find myself using my reading time to read the books they are reading. I think it's a wonderful blessing to share "book chat" with my girls but..I want to read for myself as well! We'll see how this works. It's only Tuesday and..I'm feeling somewhat accomplished. LOL.
    IN THE END, ONLY KINDNESS MATTERS
    Mom to 5 girls and 5 furry kids too
    21 Years Homeschooling and still learning

  10. #10
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    Michele, I've been meaning to try Deborah Harkness for years.

    Yesterday & today I read two short versions of an early medieval werewolf tale. (Partly because it's October & I realized I've never really read a werewolf book, then started researching the "original" werewolf story, etc. For more info, see here.) One was the version penned by Marie de France (considered by scholars to be the first female French poet). The story is Bisclaveret & is contained within a larger collection of King Arthur tales. By her rendering, the "were-wolf" is not a scary beast but a wronged knight. It is a sympathetic portrait of the creature. Her version is available for free on Project Gutenberg. It contains many of the common elements of medieval romance tales of knights & magical/supernatural happenings.

    The other version I read is a modern retelling (again, very short -- probably 40 pages or less) of Marie de France's version: Bisclavret (The Werewolf) - Medieval Paranormal Romance by Mark Lord. He keeps close to Marie de France's version but varies it enough to make it his own.

    Either or both of these would be short, easy, & interesting reading for those who want something for October that's not scary but does present an early version of a werewolf tale.

    Still working on WWZ. I've also started We Sold Our Souls by Grady Hendrix. (I really enjoyed his other books Horrorstör and My Best Friend's Exorcism, not just for the stories, but for his awesome attention to detail. For example, Horrorstör takes place in an Ikea-esque store & the book itself very closely resembles an Ikea catalog in many ways. Since I'm a publishing & graphics geek, his books get an A+ from me for those kind of details.)
    Last edited by Stacia; 10-03-2018 at 12:21 AM.

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

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