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Thread: Letter Reversals in an 8 year old

  1. #1

    Default Letter Reversals in an 8 year old

    My new 8 year old still reverses s, c, b, d, 5, and 2 regularly. She does not have dyslexia. She is an emerging reader but we are doing phonics review a couple times a week because she needed review on sound combos. She is improving greatly with reading, it is so exciting to watch! What can I do to help with letter reversals? Other than just pointing it out. I have showed her cute things to help her remember, so far, no luck.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Alabama
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    I think it will just eventually go away as she gets a bit older. But have you tried putting rice on a cookie sheet and letting her trace letters with her finger? Then she doesn’t have to concentrate on holding the pencil, too, and can think about the letter.
    Wife to David for 42 years, mom of 9, homeschooling Abby (16). Grammy to 6 granddaughters and 2 grandsons and 2 new babies due in the spring of 19! Homeschooling since 1986, Loving FIAR since 2000.

  3. #3
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    No advice, but did want to say that my 11 year old is finally writing all her letters correctly (with the rare exception of z occasionally - maybe because it is used so infrequently that she doesn't get much practice.) She doesn't have dyslexia either and at 8 I was a bit concerned. However, she is finally there. If we were doing a formal writing exercise then I'd ask her to correct them, in a matter of fact sort of way - otherwise I just let them go. She seemed to get gradually better with time.
    Sunshine - mom to 4dc - dd11, ds9 1/2, ds8 and ds6 1/2.

  4. #4
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    Set Free Academy
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    One of my dc had lots of letter reversals as well. She did not have dyslexia. We did, however, find out that the cause was something called scoptopic sensitivity, commonly known as Irlen syndrome. Keep that thought in your mind - it will likely be something your child outgrows, but if not, you might want to investigate Irlen.

    One thing I did with my oldest is to write words on the blank sides of index cards in Sharpie, then use colored pencils to emphasize one letter. The best example I can think of right now is that I kind of made the 'a' in 'apple' look like a red apple with leaves. It really helped my visual learner.
    Robin, wife for 22 years to a wonderful man, and mama to 20yo Belle; 18yo Kitty; 14yo Princess, and 12yo Boyo.
    Words for 2015 and 2016 and probably forever: Be her.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    My children reversed letters at that age, it was Irlen which can seem like dyslexia but is not. At 18 I still have one who can write them backwards if he's not wearing his tints and/or using his specially coloured paper. It's crazy weird, but just part of what he deals with.
    Kendra, wife of Lawrence, mother of three.

    I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.

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