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Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 2 (January 6th - January 12th)

  1. #11
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    I was so disappointed that my library did not have Winter Solstice available as an e-book! I ended up downloading the only one of her titles available: Wild Mountain Thyme, and will begin it soon.

    I've done a lot of reading this week! I read The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin. I almost gave it up, because there is a section of the book that is too graphic for my taste. A friend had recommended the book, and told me to just skip here and there but stick with it, because it was just one section, and the rest of the book is fine. I do see how that one section was part of the character development for one key character, but still, TMI! Basically, the book is about 4 siblings who go to a fortune teller, and how her predictions play out in their lives. It almost reads like four interlinked novellas. Overall it was a good book!

    I am almost finished with Commonwealth by Ann Patchett, she of Bel Canto fame. While I am not loving this book as much as Bel Canto, I'm enjoying it and finding it to be one of those books that I want to pick up whenever a spare minute presents itself. There are 10 central characters, and the book does jump around in time. At first, I was concerned that this would be off-putting, but it wasn't difficult to follow. A lot of time and care is taken in character development, and I always enjoy when this is well done.
    Last edited by KathleenM; 01-06-2019 at 09:06 PM.
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

  2. #12
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    Hello, book friends!!

    Stacia, I read all of Sunburn and I consider it a huge waste of my time. I will not read anymore of her books.

    Kathleen, I ditched The Immortalists because of a graphic scene which coloured my opinion of it.

    I read three books this week: Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson (this was for book club and was a reread but as I am finding with most of my rereads, I loved this book even more the second time around,) A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourne (this was an okay mystery but I don't think I will read the other's in this series) and Nevermoor by Jessica Townsend (this is a Hunger Games version for middle grade. It was okay but didn't live up to the buzzed hype surrounding it.)

    I am currently reading A Ladder in the Sky by John Boyne (author of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas) and The Greenglass House by Kate Milford (another middle grade book.)
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (19), ds (18) and dd (16)

  3. #13
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    Love seeing all this activity here and it's barely Sunday night!

    I read The Borrowed House by Hilda van Stockum. Really well done book for older elementary kids. PHP republished it and it's a lovely edition. It's about a girl in the Hitler Youth who believes the propaganda she's fed ... until she spends time in occupied Holland and sees firsthand what living (or not) under German occupation has done to the country and the people. There's a mystery, too. Glad to see this is back in print.

    For Christmas, I asked for the Library of America edition of the collected works of Flannery O'Connor. What a beautifully bound book (first LOA book that I own). I read the chronology, which is really an abbreviated bio, and have started at the beginning with her novel, Wise Blood. I know I won't read this whole volume straight through -- too heavy for that. Hoping to dip into it several times this year between other books. I've only read a few of her short stories and they are so impressive.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathleenM View Post
    I've done a lot of reading this week! I read The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin. I almost gave it up, because there is a section of the book that is too graphic for my taste. A friend had recommended the book, and told me to just skip here and there but stick with it, because it was just one section, and the rest of the book is fine. I do see how that one section was part of the character development for one key character, but still, TMI! Basically, the book is about 4 siblings who go to a fortune teller, and how her predictions play out in their lives. It almost reads like four interlinked novellas. Overall it was a good book!
    Kathleen, not sure if the Rosamunde Pilcher book you got is one that I read back in the day. I remember loving "The Shell Seekers".
    I think that I have "The Immortalists" as well as "Commonwealth" on my to-read list. I know that the latter won't be as good as "Bel Canto".

    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaT View Post
    Hello, book friends!!
    Stacia, I read all of Sunburn and I consider it a huge waste of my time. I will not read anymore of her books.
    Kathleen, I ditched The Immortalists because of a graphic scene which coloured my opinion of it.
    I read three books this week: Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson (this was for book club and was a reread but as I am finding with most of my rereads, I loved this book even more the second time around,) A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourne (this was an okay mystery but I don't think I will read the other's in this series) and Nevermoor by Jessica Townsend (this is a Hunger Games version for middle grade. It was okay but didn't live up to the buzzed hype surrounding it.)
    I am currently reading A Ladder in the Sky by John Boyne (author of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas) and The Greenglass House by Kate Milford (another middle grade book.)
    Julia, we loved "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas". Off to look into all the books you mentioned.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    Love seeing all this activity here and it's barely Sunday night!
    I read The Borrowed House by Hilda van Stockum. Really well done book for older elementary kids. PHP republished it and it's a lovely edition. It's about a girl in the Hitler Youth who believes the propaganda she's fed ... until she spends time in occupied Holland and sees firsthand what living (or not) under German occupation has done to the country and the people. There's a mystery, too. Glad to see this is back in print.
    For Christmas, I asked for the Library of America edition of the collected works of Flannery O'Connor. What a beautifully bound book (first LOA book that I own). I read the chronology, which is really an abbreviated bio, and have started at the beginning with her novel, Wise Blood. I know I won't read this whole volume straight through -- too heavy for that. Hoping to dip into it several times this year between other books. I've only read a few of her short stories and they are so impressive.
    Rebe, the LOA edition sounds gorgeous. I know what you mean about those heavy books. I have quite a few of them. I cant seem to read them very often, since I do most of my reading in bed.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Negin View Post
    I know what you mean about those heavy books. I have quite a few of them. I cant seem to read them very often, since I do most of my reading in bed.
    I thought to myself when I posted that, "I need to choose a word other than 'heavy!'" So what I meant was, not heavy pound-wise (although it is a high-quality book and probably heavier than others its size!), but heavy in the sense of emotional impact. She isn't a light, charming author - pretty profound stuff, and some (if I remember right) is emotionally draining or even disturbing. So I'm going to have to break her stuff up with lighter, or at least different, reading, I think.

    BUT - now that we're talking about the actual weight of books , here's an example of a book pillow - I need something like this.
    https://www.mileskimball.com/buy-boo...%20pillow#tabs

    If anyone uses something like this, please link to it! I'm in the market for something to prop my books - I almost always read on the couch and throw pillows are getting annoying - they don't hold the book at the right angle for me.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    I thought to myself when I posted that, "I need to choose a word other than 'heavy!'" So what I meant was, not heavy pound-wise


    I want to look at the book pillow, but their site is down for maintenance. I'll take a look later. My physiotherapist told me that one should never read in bed. I don't want to hear that. I want to read in bed!
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Negin View Post


    I want to look at the book pillow, but their site is down for maintenance. I'll take a look later. My physiotherapist told me that one should never read in bed. I don't want to hear that. I want to read in bed!
    Well, if you google reading pillow (or something similar), you'll get lots and lots of options for back support for reading in bed - do you have something like that? They're like the things teenagers use on their beds, but grown up (and more expensive). This page has many choices (some like the teenage ones, but some very grown up):
    https://bookriot.com/2017/12/30/reading-pillows/

    "Book pillow" search also brought this up, which is similar to what I linked to:
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Seat-Hol...26643733&psc=1

    Anyway, I need something like that!
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    Well, if you google reading pillow (or something similar), you'll get lots and lots of options for back support for reading in bed - do you have something like that? They're like the things teenagers use on their beds, but grown up (and more expensive). This page has many choices (some like the teenage ones, but some very grown up):
    https://bookriot.com/2017/12/30/reading-pillows/
    "Book pillow" search also brought this up, which is similar to what I linked to:
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Seat-Hol...26643733&psc=1
    Anyway, I need something like that!
    Thank you, Rebe! I'm going to look into those this weekend. I may order something with our next big order, our barrel that we get shipped down.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaT View Post
    Hello, book friends!!

    Stacia, I read all of Sunburn and I consider it a huge waste of my time. I will not read anymore of her books.
    I'm glad to hear that ditching it was the right choice, though I'm sorry you wasted your time on it.

    Those reading pillows are great. My dd would love some of those.

    I finished two books.

    The first was Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh, which I was reading for my book club. I think it was probably fairly forward-thinking for the time in which it was written (1955). I see it (sort-of) as a precursor to the simplicity & "live life with intention" movements that seem to have become especially popular/fad-ish in the past few years. I can't really find fault with it (for the time it came out): it's nice; it's mellow; it's reflective; it mirrors the simplicity & serenity she espouses. That said, I'm probably not the intended reader; I found it generally ho-hum.

    (I hated Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist. I am not really comparing Gift from the Sea to it. However, I can see that both books may appeal to those who want "philosophy-lite" approaches to life. It's not my style of reading but I know it's a style that often has general appeal for some others.)

    The other book I finished was a non-fiction selection, Conan Doyle for the Defense: The True Story of a Sensational British Murder, a Quest for Justice, and the World's Most Famous Detective Writer by Margalit Fox. I think this would really appeal to Conan Doyle fans overall. It was fairly interesting as it covered not only Conan Doyle, his activism, & his writing of Sherlock Holmes, but the general state of investigative police work in the early 1900s. (Sadly, there still seem to be some parallels to today where "the other" -- whether race or religion or some other demarcation -- gets railroaded or charged even when innocent.) If you're more interested in the story related to the particular murder itself, the last part of the book is the most interesting. Realistically, I think the part about the murder itself could have made a good, in-depth article in something like the Smithsonian or The New Yorker magazines; it didn't necessarily need to be a book. But, for fans of Conan Doyle or those who want to know more about the general time period, this book gives some additional insight & background.
    Last edited by Stacia; 01-12-2019 at 12:25 AM.

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stacia View Post
    (I hated Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist.
    Me too. From time to time, when I feel bored, which isn't too often these days. I go and look at one-star reviews on Good Reads. The one-star reviews for this one were entertaining, last I checked . There's also a very funny one-star review for a Kim Kardashian book .
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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