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Thread: Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 6 (February 3rd - February 9th)

  1. #1
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    Default Mom's Book Thread ~ Week 6 (February 3rd - February 9th)

    I hope that it's been a pleasurable reading week for all.

    Michele, I hope that everyone feels better very soon.

    Julia, happy to hear that your daughter is in Melbourne and hopefully liking it there.

    Kathleen, it was your birthday yesterday and I hope that you had a lovely day!

    I read Coronation on Carmel - 4 Stars - This book will only be of interest to Baha’is. It’s the second in a series of three, about the establishment of one of the shrines in Haifa, Israel. The shrine and the gardens surrounding it, which I’ve had the bounty of visiting a few times, are a UNESCO World Heritage site.



    I would give it 5 stars, but all the lengthy endnotes are seriously annoying. Regardless, these books are thoroughly researched and beautifully written.

    “On the negative side was an ally of Nazi Germany, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, someone determined to eliminate the Guardian (of the Baha’is) and his Shrine.” This is the Grand Mufti (Haj Amin al-Husseini) when he met Hitler in November 1941. “The Mufti, driven by his desire to expel the British and Jews from Palestine, became a Nazi ally.”



    He was known as ‘The Arab Fuhrer’ and openly incited violence against Jews his whole life. Haj Amin al-Husseini recruited Bosnian Muslims for the SS who ultimately slaughtered 90% of Bosnia's Jews. “He was linked with an organizer of the Holocaust, Adolf Eichmann. The Mufti remained in and near Germany, lavishly supported by the Nazis, broadcasting anti-Allies and anti-Jewish propaganda until 1945. On radio, he called for the destruction of the Jewish settlements in Palestine.”

    “Edward Keith-Roach, the former District Commissioner in Haifa and then Governor of Jerusalem, described the Mufti as ‘alert, shrewd and crafty’, one who played on religion ‘to the nth degree’.

    Eventually, after the re-formation of Israel the mufti's nephew, Rahman Abdul Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husseini, took over leadership of the region's Muslims. He renamed himself Yasser Arafat.

    I did not know that the decision of the Allied troops to land in Normandy took place in Tehran, Iran. In November 1943, Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin all met in Tehran, before the D-Day landings of June 6, 1944.







    MY RATING SYSTEM
    5 Stars
    The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine.
    4 Stars
    Really Good
    3 Stars
    Enjoyable
    2 Stars
    Just Okay – nothing to write home about
    1 Star
    Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

  2. #2
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    Happy Birthday, Kathleen!!

    I read My Sister is a Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. I don't really know how to classify this book or what to say about it. I have heard people say that it is a lighthearted look at a woman whose sister is... you guessed it...a serial killer. I have also heard others regard it as funny. I didn't find it that way at all. I found it a very sad book. I really liked it but I was very sad for the main character when I finished.

    I am currently reading French Exit by Patrick DeWitt. It has been on the long list for the Giller Prize and I think the Mann Booker Prize. I have not read DeWitt before but, so far I am liking this story of a rich mother and son who lose their money. I am also buddy reading with a group of fellow bookstagrammers Willa Cather's Death Comes for the Archbishop. So far, I am liking this one as well.
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (19), ds (18) and dd (16)

  3. #3
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    Happy Birthday, Kathleen!

    Michele, hugs & hope everyone is feeling better soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaT View Post
    I read My Sister is a Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. I don't really know how to classify this book or what to say about it. I have heard people say that it is a lighthearted look at a woman whose sister is... you guessed it...a serial killer. I have also heard others regard it as funny. I didn't find it that way at all. I found it a very sad book. I really liked it but I was very sad for the main character when I finished.

    I am currently reading French Exit by Patrick DeWitt. It has been on the long list for the Giller Prize and I think the Mann Booker Prize. I have not read DeWitt before but, so far I am liking this story of a rich mother and son who lose their money.
    Julia, I think I had a similar reaction to My Sister is a Serial Killer. I just didn't find the humor there. I think it would be an interesting one for a book club w/ some discussions of a female being a serial killer (since it's usually males who are serial killers), her blasé attitude, dysfunctional families, responsibility, etc.

    I read Patrick deWitt's The Sisters Brothers a few years ago & really liked it. Kind of a noir Western.

    I'm currently reading my book club book I Heard the Owl Call My Name by Margaret Craven. It's a small, quiet book so far. But, I think it's going to get sad. (I'm not looking forward to it if so, since I will cry for sure & then that, in turn, will give me a raging headache.)

    (Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.)
    Celebrate your freedom to read! Read a banned book!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the birthday wishes ladies!

    I am reading Life Inside the Bubble by Dan Bongino. It is a non-fiction account of his work as a New York policeman and later a Secret Service agent. It's not great, but it has its interesting moments. If you are curious about the Secret Service or wonder what that life would be like, this would interest you. It is not a tell-all gossip book about the protectees he served. He tells some anecdotes, but thus far it does not seem that the goal is to dish dirt on presidents or their families. He does give some insider's views on things he thinks are dysfunctional in government agencies.
    ~eclectic homeschooling mom of 3

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    I am reading the most wonderful book - I just love when that happens! I've read some good ones already this year, but Pachinko stands out. It's a multi-generational family saga of a Korean family from about 1910 to the 1980s, I think. Truly amazing. Told in a very linear, simple fashion, but beautifully written and full of so much I didn't know about Japanese occupation of Korea (before North and South Korea), Koreans in Japan before WWII, and the aftermath of that - which is where I am now in the book. So many complex relationships - men and women, siblings, parents and children, employers and workers, Koreans and Japanese, urban and rural, rich and poor, etc. I'm going to be sad when this one is over! I already feel like I personally know each character, they've become so real to me.
    "Ree-bee," Mom to former United States Marine ds and math teacher DIL * artist dd 20 * motion-loving ds 17 * piano-playing ds 12
    "For Miss Minnie loved children and she loved books, and she taught merely by introducing the one to the other." from "A Consent," by Wendell Berry

  6. #6
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    Stacia, I am thinking of choosing My Sister for book club when it is my turn to pick the book. There is a lot to discuss with that book.

    Rebe, I'm glad that you are loving Pachinko. It has been on my TBR pile for a long, long time but I keep sliding it down to the bottom. After reading how much you like it I will put it at the top now.
    Julia
    mom of 3 -- dd (19), ds (18) and dd (16)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebe View Post
    I am reading the most wonderful book - I just love when that happens! I've read some good ones already this year, but Pachinko stands out. It's a multi-generational family saga of a Korean family from about 1910 to the 1980s, I think. Truly amazing. Told in a very linear, simple fashion, but beautifully written and full of so much I didn't know about Japanese occupation of Korea (before North and South Korea), Koreans in Japan before WWII, and the aftermath of that - which is where I am now in the book. So many complex relationships - men and women, siblings, parents and children, employers and workers, Koreans and Japanese, urban and rural, rich and poor, etc. I'm going to be sad when this one is over! I already feel like I personally know each character, they've become so real to me.
    Pachinko is already on my wish list!

    I want to reply to everyone, but have had such little time to do so. I love hearing what everyone else is reading.
    "There is no peace that cannot be found in the present moment." - Tasha Tudor

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